A recruiter calls me to talk about a Data Science position in Pune…

A recruiter calls me this morning, from Hyderabad, all unexpectedly. No emails beforehand, no recruiter messages at a jobs-site, no SMSs, nothing. Just a direct call. They are considering me for a Data Science position, in Pune. She says it’s a position about Data Science and Python.

Asks about my total and relevant experience. I tell: 23 years in all, ~12 years in s/w development. She asks about my Python experience. I tell: Familiarity for, may be, 10 years if not more; actual use for, may be, 5–6 years. (Turns out to be since 2006, and since at least 2013–14 times, in connection with scripting while using the open-source FEM libraries, respectively.)

She then asks me about my data science experience.

I tell that I’ve been into it for about a year by now, but no professional, paid experience as such. Also add that I do understand kernels from the Kaggle competitions. (In fact, I can think of bringing about meaningful variations in them too.)

She asks about my last job. I tell: Academia, recently, after PhD. (She sounds a bit concerned, may be confused. She must be looking at my resume.) But before that, I was in the software field, I say. And now, am now looking for a Data Science position. I then add: In the software development field, my last job was as a Systems Architect, reporting directly to the CEO. … By this time, she must have spotted this software experience listing in my resume. She says “OK,” with just a shade of a sense of satisfaction audible in the way she sounds.

She then again asks me about my Data Science experience. I now tell her directly: Paid experience, 0 (zero) years.

Hearing it, she keeps the phone down. Just like that. Without any concluding remarks. Not even just a veneer of a courtesey like a hurried “OK, if you are found suitable, we will get back to you” etc. Nothing. Not even that. No thanks, nothing.

She. Just. Keeps. The. Phone. Down.


It must be a project for one of those companies from America, especially from California, especially from the San Francisco Bay Area. Only they can be as dumbidiots* as that. And, they could very well be one of those “Capitalist”s, esp. Indians—there and here. “You are just as good as your performance on your last job!” Said sternly. And, the quote taken literally. In the current context, it is obviously taken to mean that I am as good as zero, when it comes to Data Science positions.

Dumbidiots*. Zeno’s descendents. They don’t deserve to hire me.

But these stupididiots* do amass a lot of money for themselves. Help build the nation. Etc.

Rich idiocy.


*By the rules of the Sanskrit grammar, this “sandhi” is correct. English is an Indo-European language. So, such a “sandhi” should be allowed. The jointed word means something like “k’mt’om” [^] “moorkha”. (You look up “moorkha”.)


A song I like:
(Hindi) “hum the, woh thee, aur, samaa rangeen…”
Singer: Kishore Kumar
Lyrics: Majrooh Sultanpuri
Music: S. D. Burman

 

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Data Science links—1

Oakay… My bookmarks library has grown too big. Time to move at least a few of them to a blog-post. Here they are. … The last one is not on Data Science, but it happens to be the most important one of them all!



On Bayes’ theorem:

Oscar Bonilla. “Visualizing Bayes’ theorem” [^].

Jayesh Thukarul. “Bayes’ Theorem explained” [^].

Victor Powell. “Conditional probability” [^].


Explanations with visualizations:

Victor Powell. “Explained Visually.” [^]

Christopher Olah. Many topics [^]. For instance, see “Calculus on computational graphs: backpropagation” [^].


Fooling the neural network:

Julia Evans. “How to trick a neural network into thinking a panda is a vulture” [^].

Andrej Karpathy. “Breaking linear classifiers on ImageNet” [^].

A. Nguyen, J. Yosinski, and J. Clune. “Deep neural networks are easily fooled: High confidence predictions for unrecognizable images” [^]

Melanie Mitchell. “Artificial Intelligence hits the barrier of meaning” [^]


The Most Important link!

Ijad Madisch. “Why I hire scientists, and why you should, too” [^]


A song I like:

(Western, pop) “Billie Jean”
Artist: Michael Jackson

[Back in the ’80s, this song used to get played in the restaurants from the Pune camp area, and also in the cinema halls like West-End, Rahul, Alka, etc. The camp area was so beautiful, back then—also uncrowded, and quiet.

This song would also come floating on the air, while sitting in the evening at the Quark cafe, situated in the middle of all the IITM hostels (next to skating rink). Some or the other guy would be playing it in a nearby hostel room on one of those stereo systems which would come with those 1 or 2 feet tall “hi-fi” speaker-boxes. Each box typically had three stacked speakers. A combination of a separately sitting sub-woofer with a few small other boxes or a soundbar, so ubiquitous today, had not been invented yet… Back then, Quark was a completely open-air cafe—a small patch of ground surrounded by small trees, and a tiny hexagonal hut, built in RCC, for serving snacks. There were no benches, even, at Quark. People would sit on those small concrete blocks (brought from the civil department where they would come for testing). Deer would be roaming very nearby around. A daring one or two could venture to come forward and eat pizza out of your (fully) extended hand!…

…Anyway, coming back to the song itself, I had completely forgotten it, but got reminded when @curiouswavefn mentioned it in one of his tweets recently. … When I read the tweet, I couldn’t make out that it was this song (apart from Bach’s variations) that he was referring to. I just idly checked out both of them, and then, while listening to it, I suddenly recognized this song. … You see, unlike so many other guys of e-schools of our times, I wouldn’t listen to a lot of Western pop-songs those days (and still don’t). Beatles, ABBA and a few other groups/singers, may be, also the Western instrumentals (a lot) and the Western classical music (some, but definitely). But somehow, I was never too much into the Western pop songs. … Another thing. The way these Western singers sing, it used to be very, very hard for me to figure out the lyrics back then—and the situation continues mostly the same way even today! So, recognizing a song by its name was simply out of the question….

… Anyway, do check out the links (even if some of them appear to be out of your reach on the first reading), and enjoy the song. … Take care, and bye for now…]

 

Further on QM, and on changing tracks over to Data Science

OK. As decided, I took a short trip to IIT Bombay, and saw a couple of professors of physics, for very brief face-to-face interactions on the 28th evening.

No chalk-work at the blackboard had to be done, because both of them were very busy—but also quick, really very quick, in getting to the meat of the matter.


As to the first professor I saw, I knew beforehand that he wouldn’t be very enthusiastic with any alternatives to anything in the mainstream QM.

He was already engrossed in a discussion with someone (who looked like a PhD student) when I knocked at the door of his cabin. The prof immediately mentioned that he has to finish (what looked like a few tons of) pending work items, before going away on a month-long trip just after a couple of days! But, hey, as I said (in my last post), directly barging into a professor’s cabin has always done wonders for me! So, despite his having some heavy^{heavy} schedule, he still motioned me to sit down for a quick and short interaction.

The three of us (the prof, his student, and me) then immediately had a very highly compressed discussion for some 15-odd minutes. As expected, the discussion turned out to be not only very rapid, and also quite uneven, because there were so many abrupt changes to the sub-topics and sub-issues, as they were being brought up and dispatched in quick succession. …

It was not an ideal time to introduce my new approach, and so, I didn’t. I did mention, however, that I was trying to develop some such a thing. The professor was of the opinion that if you come up with a way to do faster simulations, it would always be welcome, but if you are going to argue against the well-established laws, then… [he just shook head].

I told him that I was clear, very clear on one point. Suppose, I said, that I have a complex-valued field that is defined only over the physical 3D, and suppose further that my new approach (which involves such a 3D field) does work out. Then, suppose further that I get essentially the same results as the mainstream QM does.

In such a case, I said, I am going to say that here is a possibility of looking at it as a real physical mechanism underlying the QM theory.

And if people even then say that because it is in some way different from the established laws, therefore it is not to be taken seriously, then I am very clear that I am going to say: “You go your way and I will go mine.”

But of course, I further added, that I still don’t know yet how the calculations are done in the mainstream QM for the interacting electrons—that is, without invoking simplifying approximations (such as the fixed nucleus). I wanted to see how these calculations are done using the computational modeling approach (not the perturbation theory).

It was at this point that the professor really got the sense of what I was trying to get at. He then remarked that variational formulations are capable enough, and proceeded to outline some of their features. To my query as to what kind of an ansatz they use, and what kind of parameters are involved in inducing the variations, he mentioned Chebyshev polynomials and a few other things. The student mentioned the Slater determinants. Then the professor remarked that the particulars of the ansatz and the particulars of the variational techniques were not so crucial because all these techniques ultimately boil down to just diagonalizing a matrix. Somehow, I instinctively got the idea that he hasn’t been very much into numerical simulations himself, which turned out to be the case. In fact he immediately said so himself: “I don’t do wavefunctions. [Someone else from the same department] does it.” I decided to see this other professor the next day, because it was already evening (almost approaching 6 PM or so).

A few wonderful clarifications later, it was time for me to leave, and so I thanked the professor profusely for accommodating me. The poor fellow didn’t even have the time to notice my gratitude; he had already switched back to his interrupted discussion with the student.

But yes, the meeting was fruitful to me because the prof did get the “nerve” of the issue right, and in fact also gave me two very helpful papers to study, both of them being review articles. After coming home, I have now realized that while one of them is quite relevant to me, the other one is absolutely god-damn relevant!


Anyway, after coming out of the department on that evening, I was thinking of calling my friend to let him know that the purpose of the visit to the campus was over, and thus I was totally free. While thinking about calling him and walking through the parking lot, I just abruptly noticed a face that suddenly flashed something recognizable to me. It was this same second professor who “does wavefunctions!”

I had planned on seeing him the next day, but here he was, right in front me, walking towards his car in a leisurely mood. Translated, it meant: he was very much free of all his students, and so was available for a chat with me! Right now!! Of course, I had never had made any acquaintance with him in the past. I had only browsed through his home page once in the recent times, and so could immediately make out the face, that’s all. He was just about to open the door of his car when I approached him and introduced myself. There followed another intense bout of discussions, for another 10-odd minutes.

This second prof has done numerical simulations himself, and so, he was even faster in getting a sense of what kind of ideas I was toying with. Once again, I told him that I was trying for some new ideas but didn’t get any deeper into my approach, because I myself still don’t know whether my approach will produce the same results as the mainstream QM does or not. In any case, knowing the mainstream method of handling these things was crucial, I said.

I told him how, despite my extensive Internet searches, I had not found suitable material for doing calculations. He then said that he will give me the details about a book. I should study this book first, and if there are still some difficulties or some discussions to be had, then he would be available, but the discussion would then have to progress in reference to what is already given in that book. Neat idea, this one was, perfect by me. And turns out that the book he suggested was neat—absolutely perfectly relevant to my needs, background as well as preparation.


And with that ends this small story of this short visit to IIT Bombay. I went there with a purpose, and returned with one 50 page-long and very tightly written review paper, a second paper of some 20+ tightly written pages, and a reference to an entire PG-level book (about 500 pages). All of this material absolutely unknown to me despite my searches, and as it seems as of today, all of it being of utmost relevance to me, my new ideas.


But I have to get into Data Science first. Else I cannot survive. (I have been borrowing money to fend off the credit card minimum due amounts every month.)

So, I have decided to take a rest for today, and from tomorrow onwards, or may be a day later—i.e., starting from the “shubh muhurat” (auspicious time) of the April Fool’s day, I will begin my full-time pursuit of Data Science, with all that new material on QM only to be studied on a part-time basis. For today, however, I am just going to be doing a bit of a time-pass here and there. That’s how this post got written.

Take care, and wish you the same kind of luck as I had in spotting that second prof just like that in the parking lot. … If my approach works, then I know who to contact first with my results, for informal comments on them. … I wish you this same kind of a luck…

Work hard, and bye for now.


A song I like
(Marathi) “dhunda_ madhumati raat re, naath re…”
Music: Master Krishnarao
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Lyrics: G. D. Madgulkar

[A Marathi classic. Credits are listed in a purely random order. A version that seems official (released by Rajshri Marathi) is here: [^] . However, somehow, the first stanza is not complete in it.

As to the set shown in this (and all such) movies, right up to, say the movie “Bajirao-Mastani,” I have—and always had—an issue. The open wide spaces for the palaces they show in the movies are completely unrealistic, given the technology of those days (and the actual remains of the palaces that are easy to be recalled by anyone). The ancients (whether here in India or at any other place) simply didn’t have the kind of technology which is needed in order to build such hugely wide internal (covered) spaces. Neitehr the so-called “Roman arch” (invented millenia earlier in India, I gather), nor the use of the monolithic stones for girders could possibly be enough to generate such huge spans. Idiots. If they can’t get even simple calculations right, that’s only to be expected—from them. But if they can’t even recall the visual details of the spans actually seen for the old palaces, that is simply inexcusable. Absolutely thorough morons, these movie-makers must be.]

 

Work Is Punishment

Work is not worship—they said.

It’s a punishment, full stop!—they said.

One that is to be smilingly borne.

Else you lose your job.

And so lose everything else too. …


Hmmm… I said. … I was confused.

Work is enjoyment, actually. … I then discovered.

I told them.


They didn’t believe.

Not when I said it.

Not because they ceased believing in me.

It’s just that. They. Simply. Didn’t. Believe. In. It.

And they professed to believe in

a lot of things that never did make

any sense to themselves.

They said so.

And it was so.


A long many years have passed by, since then.


Now, whether they believe in it or not,

I have come to believe in this gem:

Work is punishment—full stop.


That’s the principle on the basis of which I am henceforth going to operate.

And yes! This still is a poem alright?

[What do you think most poems written these days are like?]

It remains a poem.


And I am going to make money. A handsome amount of money.

For once in my life-time.

After all, one can make money and still also write poems.

That’s what they say.

Or do science. Real science. Physics. Even physics for that matter.

Or, work. Real work, too.


It’s better than having no money and…

.