LOL!

LOL!

Yeah! Just that!

LOL!!



Update on 2020.02.17 16:02 IST:

The above is a snap I took yesterday at the Bhau Institute [^]’s event: “Pune Startup Fest” [^].

The reason I found myself laughing out loud was this: Yesterday, some of the distinguished panelists made one thing very clear: The valuation for the same product is greater in the S.F. Bay Area than in Pune, because the eco-system there is much more mature, with the investors there having seen many more exits—whether successful or otherwise.

Hmmm…

When I was in the USA (which was in the 1990s), they would always say that not every one has to rush there to the USA, especially to the S.F. Bay Area, because technology works the same way everywhere, and hence, people should rather be going back to India. The “they” of course included the Indians already established there.

In short, their never-stated argument was this much: You can make as much money by working from India as from the SF Bay Area. (Examples of the “big three” of Indian IT Industry would often be cited, esp. of Narayana Moorthy’s.) So, “why flock in here”?

Looks like, even if they took some 2–3 decades to do so, finally, something better seems to have downed on them. They seem to have gotten to the truth, which is: Market valuations for the same product are much greater in the SF Bay Area than elsewhere!

So, this all was in the background, in the context.

Then, I was musing about their rate of learning last night, and that’s when I wrote this post! Hence the title.

But of course, not every thing was laughable about, or in, the event.

I particularly liked Vatsal Kanakiya’s enthusiasm (the second guy from the right in the above photo, his LinkedIn profile is here [^]). I appreciated his ability to keep on highlighting what they (their firm) are doing, despite a somewhat cocky (if not outright dismissive) way in which his points were being seen, at least initially. Students attending the event might have found his enthusiasm more in line with theirs, especially after he not only mentioned Guy Kawasaki’s 10-20-30 rule [^], but also cited a statistics from their own office to support it: 1892 proposals last month (if I got that figure right). … Even if he was very young, it was this point which finally made it impossible, for many in that hall, to be too dismissive of him. (BTW, he is from Mumbai, not Pune. (Yes, COEP is in Pune.))

 


A song I like:

(Hindi) ये मेरे अंधेरे उजाले ना होते (“ye mere andhere ujaale naa hote”)
Music: Salil Chowdhury
Singers: Talat Mahmood, Lata Mangeshkar
Lyrics: Rajinder Kishen

[Buildings made from the granite stone [I studied geology in my SE i.e. second year of engineering] have a way of reminding you of a few songs. Drama! Contrast!! Life!!! Money!!!! Success!!!!! Competition Success Review!!!!!!  Governments!!!!!!! *Business*men!!!!!!!!]

 

 

A recruiter calls me to talk about a Data Science position in Pune…

A recruiter calls me this morning, from Hyderabad, all unexpectedly. No emails beforehand, no recruiter messages at a jobs-site, no SMSs, nothing. Just a direct call. They are considering me for a Data Science position, in Pune. She says it’s a position about Data Science and Python.

Asks about my total and relevant experience. I tell: 23 years in all, ~12 years in s/w development. She asks about my Python experience. I tell: Familiarity for, may be, 10 years if not more; actual use for, may be, 5–6 years. (Turns out to be since 2006, and since at least 2013–14 times, in connection with scripting while using the open-source FEM libraries, respectively.)

She then asks me about my data science experience.

I tell that I’ve been into it for about a year by now, but no professional, paid experience as such. Also add that I do understand kernels from the Kaggle competitions. (In fact, I can think of bringing about meaningful variations in them too.)

She asks about my last job. I tell: Academia, recently, after PhD. (She sounds a bit concerned, may be confused. She must be looking at my resume.) But before that, I was in the software field, I say. And now, am now looking for a Data Science position. I then add: In the software development field, my last job was as a Systems Architect, reporting directly to the CEO. … By this time, she must have spotted this software experience listing in my resume. She says “OK,” with just a shade of a sense of satisfaction audible in the way she sounds.

She then again asks me about my Data Science experience. I now tell her directly: Paid experience, 0 (zero) years.

Hearing it, she keeps the phone down. Just like that. Without any concluding remarks. Not even just a veneer of a courtesey like a hurried “OK, if you are found suitable, we will get back to you” etc. Nothing. Not even that. No thanks, nothing.

She. Just. Keeps. The. Phone. Down.


It must be a project for one of those companies from America, especially from California, especially from the San Francisco Bay Area. Only they can be as dumbidiots* as that. And, they could very well be one of those “Capitalist”s, esp. Indians—there and here. “You are just as good as your performance on your last job!” Said sternly. And, the quote taken literally. In the current context, it is obviously taken to mean that I am as good as zero, when it comes to Data Science positions.

Dumbidiots*. Zeno’s descendents. They don’t deserve to hire me.

But these stupididiots* do amass a lot of money for themselves. Help build the nation. Etc.

Rich idiocy.


*By the rules of the Sanskrit grammar, this “sandhi” is correct. English is an Indo-European language. So, such a “sandhi” should be allowed. The jointed word means something like “k’mt’om” [^] “moorkha”. (You look up “moorkha”.)


A song I like:
(Hindi) “hum the, woh thee, aur, samaa rangeen…”
Singer: Kishore Kumar
Lyrics: Majrooh Sultanpuri
Music: S. D. Burman

 

Work Is Punishment

Work is not worship—they said.

It’s a punishment, full stop!—they said.

One that is to be smilingly borne.

Else you lose your job.

And so lose everything else too. …


Hmmm… I said. … I was confused.

Work is enjoyment, actually. … I then discovered.

I told them.


They didn’t believe.

Not when I said it.

Not because they ceased believing in me.

It’s just that. They. Simply. Didn’t. Believe. In. It.

And they professed to believe in

a lot of things that never did make

any sense to themselves.

They said so.

And it was so.


A long many years have passed by, since then.


Now, whether they believe in it or not,

I have come to believe in this gem:

Work is punishment—full stop.


That’s the principle on the basis of which I am henceforth going to operate.

And yes! This still is a poem alright?

[What do you think most poems written these days are like?]

It remains a poem.


And I am going to make money. A handsome amount of money.

For once in my life-time.

After all, one can make money and still also write poems.

That’s what they say.

Or do science. Real science. Physics. Even physics for that matter.

Or, work. Real work, too.


It’s better than having no money and…

.