Data Science links—1

Oakay… My bookmarks library has grown too big. Time to move at least a few of them to a blog-post. Here they are. … The last one is not on Data Science, but it happens to be the most important one of them all!



On Bayes’ theorem:

Oscar Bonilla. “Visualizing Bayes’ theorem” [^].

Jayesh Thukarul. “Bayes’ Theorem explained” [^].

Victor Powell. “Conditional probability” [^].


Explanations with visualizations:

Victor Powell. “Explained Visually.” [^]

Christopher Olah. Many topics [^]. For instance, see “Calculus on computational graphs: backpropagation” [^].


Fooling the neural network:

Julia Evans. “How to trick a neural network into thinking a panda is a vulture” [^].

Andrej Karpathy. “Breaking linear classifiers on ImageNet” [^].

A. Nguyen, J. Yosinski, and J. Clune. “Deep neural networks are easily fooled: High confidence predictions for unrecognizable images” [^]

Melanie Mitchell. “Artificial Intelligence hits the barrier of meaning” [^]


The Most Important link!

Ijad Madisch. “Why I hire scientists, and why you should, too” [^]


A song I like:

(Western, pop) “Billie Jean”
Artist: Michael Jackson

[Back in the ’80s, this song used to get played in the restaurants from the Pune camp area, and also in the cinema halls like West-End, Rahul, Alka, etc. The camp area was so beautiful, back then—also uncrowded, and quiet.

This song would also come floating on the air, while sitting in the evening at the Quark cafe, situated in the middle of all the IITM hostels (next to skating rink). Some or the other guy would be playing it in a nearby hostel room on one of those stereo systems which would come with those 1 or 2 feet tall “hi-fi” speaker-boxes. Each box typically had three stacked speakers. A combination of a separately sitting sub-woofer with a few small other boxes or a soundbar, so ubiquitous today, had not been invented yet… Back then, Quark was a completely open-air cafe—a small patch of ground surrounded by small trees, and a tiny hexagonal hut, built in RCC, for serving snacks. There were no benches, even, at Quark. People would sit on those small concrete blocks (brought from the civil department where they would come for testing). Deer would be roaming very nearby around. A daring one or two could venture to come forward and eat pizza out of your (fully) extended hand!…

…Anyway, coming back to the song itself, I had completely forgotten it, but got reminded when @curiouswavefn mentioned it in one of his tweets recently. … When I read the tweet, I couldn’t make out that it was this song (apart from Bach’s variations) that he was referring to. I just idly checked out both of them, and then, while listening to it, I suddenly recognized this song. … You see, unlike so many other guys of e-schools of our times, I wouldn’t listen to a lot of Western pop-songs those days (and still don’t). Beatles, ABBA and a few other groups/singers, may be, also the Western instrumentals (a lot) and the Western classical music (some, but definitely). But somehow, I was never too much into the Western pop songs. … Another thing. The way these Western singers sing, it used to be very, very hard for me to figure out the lyrics back then—and the situation continues mostly the same way even today! So, recognizing a song by its name was simply out of the question….

… Anyway, do check out the links (even if some of them appear to be out of your reach on the first reading), and enjoy the song. … Take care, and bye for now…]

 

But I shall not ever do promise…

But I shall not ever do promise that I shall not write a blog-post such as my last one! [^]


A song I like:
I am in a fix. There are two songs, both sung by a Pune-based (and fortunately) little-known lady (also, unfortunately, a caste-Brahmin, going by the surname and all, obviously). I will pick one up at random and continue to run the show in here for now. (As it so happens, the other song, I had already run, though I found it worth repeating too. It’s just that I am not going to repeat it right now.) Here is the one I have in mind for today:

(Marathi) “sunyaa sunyaa mehafilit maajhyaa …”
Lyrics: Suresh Bhat (aided in a small measure, I now gather, by Jabbar Patel, and then, finally, by Shanta Shelke)
Music: Hridaynath Mangeshkar
Singer: Devaki Pandit (as recorded in the Sahyaadri Doordarshan studio).

[Personal comments: Yes, I loved the tune of it, right from the first time I heard it. No, when I first heard it, the lyrics simply didn’t make any sense. (Some of them do, now!). No, for whatever my opinion is worth, Lata’s rendering had always sounded a bit too shrill (or “karkashsha”) to me. … To the point that I had come to slot this song down in my list, always. (Ditto, for the theme of the movie in which it appeared—though not the actress or her acting in this movie.) But when I heard this version (just recently), I then began liking this entire song too.


But speaking of other things, yes, I again got rejected today in a job application. Within minutes. For an MNC (probably an American-owned). By an IIT K-trained (highly junior) guy named Jain. (Not sure about his own competence. Don’t have any idea about it—not even after having gone through his LinkedIn profile.)

So, I am completely jobless, anyway.


Stay tuned for further updates. I shall write. On whatever it is about which I want to write.

 

The rule of omitting the self-field in calculations—and whether potentials have an objective existence or not

There was an issue concerning the strictly classical, non-relativistic electricity which I was (once again) confronted with, during my continuing preoccupation with quantum mechanics.

Actually, a small part of this issue had occurred to me earlier too, and I had worked through it back then.

However, the overall issue had never occurred to me with as much of scope, generality and force as it did last evening. And I could not immediately resolve it. So, for a while, especially last night, I unexpectedly found myself to have become very confused, even discouraged.

Then, this morning, after a good night’s rest, everything became clear right while sipping my morning cup of tea. Things came together literally within a span of just a few minutes. I want to share the issue and its resolution with you.

The question in question (!) is the following.


Consider 2 (or N) number of point-charges, say electrons. Each electron sets up an electrostatic (Coulombic) potential everywhere in space, for the other electrons to “feel”.

As you know, the potential set up by the i-th electron is:
V_i(\vec{r}_i, \vec{r}) = \dfrac{1}{4 \pi \epsilon_0} \dfrac{Q_i}{|\vec{r} - \vec{r}_i|}
where \vec{r}_i is the position vector of the i-th electron, \vec{r} is any arbitrary point in space, and Q_i is the charge of the i-th electron.

The potential energy associated with some other (j-th) electron being at the position \vec{r}_j (i.e. the energy that the system acquires in bringing the two electrons from \infty to their respective positions some finite distance apart), is then given as:
U_{ij}(\vec{r}_i, \vec{r}_j) = \dfrac{1}{4 \pi \epsilon_0} \dfrac{Q_i\,Q_j}{|\vec{r}_j - \vec{r}_i|}

The notation followed here is the following: In U_{ij}, the potential field is produced by the i-th electron, and the work is done by the j-th electron against the i-th electron.

Symmetrically, the potential energy for this configuration can also be expressed as:
U_{ji}(\vec{r}_j, \vec{r}_i) = \dfrac{1}{4 \pi \epsilon_0} \dfrac{Q_j\,Q_i}{|\vec{r}_i - \vec{r}_j|}

If a system has only two charges, then its total potential energy U can be expressed either as U_{ji} or as U_{ij}. Thus,
U = U_{ji} = U_{ij}

Similarly, for any pair of charges in an N-particle system, too. Therefore, the total energy of an N-particle system is given as:
U = \sum\limits_{i}^{N} \sum\limits_{j = i+1}^{N} U_{ij}

The issue now is this: Can we say that the total potential energy U has an objective existence in the physical world? Or is it just a device of calculations that we have invented, just a concept from maths that has no meaningful physical counterpart?

(A side remark: Energy may perhaps exist as an attribute or property of something else, and not necessarily as a separate physical object by itself. However, existence as an attribute still is an objective existence.)

The reason to raise this doubt is the following.


When calculating the motion of the i-th charge, we consider only the potentials V_j produced by the other charges, not the potential produced by the given charge V_i itself.

Now, if the potential produced by the given charge (V_i) also exists at every point in space, then why does it not enter the calculations? How does its physical efficacy get evaporated away? And, symmetrically: The motion of the j-th charge occurs as if V_j had physically evaporated away.

The issue generalizes in a straight-forward manner. If there are N number of charges, then for calculating the motion of a given i-th charge, the potential fields of all other charges are considered operative. But not its own field.

How can motion become sensitive to only a part of the total potential energy existing at a point even if the other part also exists at the same point? That is the question.


This circumstance seems to indicate as if there is subjectivity built deep into the very fabric of classical mechanics. It is as if the universe just knows what a subject is going to calculate, and accordingly, it just makes the corresponding field mystically go away. The universe—the physical universe—acts as if it were changing in response to what we choose to do in our mind. Mind you, the universe seems to change in response to not just our observations (as in QM), but even as we merely proceed to do calculations. How does that come to happen?… May be the whole physical universe exists only in our imagination?

Got the point?


No, my confusion was not as pathetic as that in the previous paragraph. But I still found myself being confused about how to account for the fact that an electron’s own field does not enter the calculations.

But it was not all. A non-clarity on this issue also meant that there was another confusing issue which also raised its head. This secondary issue arises out of the fact that the Coulombic potential set up by any point-charge is singular in nature (or at least approximately so).

If the electron is a point-particle and if its own potential “is” \infty at its position, then why does it at all get influenced by the finite potential of any other charge? That is the question.

Notice, the second issue is most acute when the potentials in question are singular in nature. But even if you arbitrarily remove the singularity by declaring (say by fiat) a finite size for the electron, thereby making its own field only finitely large (and not infinite), the above-mentioned issue still remains. So long as its own field is finite but much, much larger than the potential of any other charge, the effects due to the other charges should become comparatively less significant, perhaps even negligibly small. Why does this not happen? Why does the rule instead go exactly the other way around, and makes those much smaller effects due to other charges count, but not the self-field of the very electron in question?


While thinking about QM, there was a certain point where this entire gamut of issues became important—whether the potential has an objective existence or not, the rule of omitting the self-field while calculating motions of particles, the singular potential, etc.

The specific issue I was trying to think through was: two interacting particles (e.g. the two electrons in the helium atom). It was while thinking on this problem that this problem occurred to me. And then, it also led me to wonder: what if some intellectual goon in the guise of a physicist comes along, and says that my proposal isn’t valid because there is this element of subjectivity to it? This thought occurred to me with all its force only last night. (Or so I think.) And I could not recall seeing a ready-made answer in a text-book or so. Nor could I figure it out immediately, at night, after a whole day’s work. And as I failed to resolve the anticipated objection, I progressively got more and more confused last night, even discouraged.

However, this morning, it all got resolved in a jiffy.


Would you like to give it a try? Why is it that while calculating the motion of the i-th charge, you consider the potentials set up by all the rest of the charges, but not its own potential field? Why this rule? Get this part right, and all the philosophical humbug mentioned earlier just evaporates away too.

I would wait for a couple of days or so before coming back and providing you with the answer I found. May be I will write another post about it.


Update on 2019.03.16 20:14 IST: Corrected the statement concerning the total energy of a two-electron system. Also simplified the further discussion by couching it preferably in terms of potentials rather than energies (as in the first published version), because a Coulombic potential always remains anchored in the given charge—it doesn’t additionally depend on the other charges the way energy does. Modified the notation to reflect the emphasis on the potentials rather than energy.


A song I like:

[What else? [… see the songs section in the last post.]]
(Hindi) “woh dil kahaan se laaoon…”
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Music: Ravi
Lyrics: Rajinder Kishen


A bit of a conjecture as to why Ravi’s songs tend to be so hummable, of a certain simplicity, especially, almost always based on a very simple rhythm. My conjecture is that because Ravi grew up in an atmosphere of “bhajan”-singing.

Observe that it is in the very nature of music that it puts your mind into an abstract frame of mind. Observe any singer, especially the non-professional ones (or the ones who are not very highly experienced in controlling their body-language while singing, as happens to singers who participate in college events or talent shows).

When they sing, their eyes seem to roll in a very peculiar manner. It seems random but it isn’t. It’s as if the eyes involuntarily get set in the motions of searching for something definite to be found somewhere, as if the thing to be found would be in the concrete physical space outside, but within a split-second, the eyes again move as if the person has realized that nothing corresponding is to be found in the world out there. That’s why the eyes “roll away.” The same thing goes on repeating, as the singer passes over various words, points of pauses, nuances, or musical phrases.

The involuntary motions of the eyes of the singer provide a window into his experience of music. It’s as if his consciousness was again and again going on registering a sequence of two very fleeting experiences: (i) a search for something in the outside world corresponding to an inner experience felt in the present, and immediately later, (ii) a realization (and therefore the turning away of the eyes from an initially picked up tentative direction) that nothing in the outside world would match what was being searched for.

The experience of music necessarily makes you realize the abstractness of itself. It tends to make you realize that the root-referents of your musical experience lie not in a specific object or phenomenon in the physical world, but in the inner realm, that of your own emotions, judgments, self-reflections, etc.

This nature of music makes it ideally suited to let you turn your attention away from the outside world, and has the capacity or potential to induce a kind of a quiet self-reflection in you.

But the switch from the experience of frustrated searches into the outside world to a quiet self-reflection within oneself is not the only option available here. Music can also induce in you a transitioning from those unfulfilled searches to a frantic kind of an activity: screams, frantic shouting, random gyrations, and what not. In evidence, observe any piece of modern American / Western pop-music.

However, when done right, music can also induce a state of self-reflection, and by evoking certain kind of emotions, it can even lead to a sense of orderliness, peace, serenity. To make this part effective, such a music has to be simple enough, and orderly enough. That’s why devotional music in the refined cultural traditions is, as a rule, of a certain kind of simplicity.

The experience of music isn’t the highest possible spiritual experience. But if done right, it can make your transition from the ordinary experience to a deep, profound spiritual experience easy. And doing it right involves certain orderliness, simplicity in all respects: tune, tone, singing style, rhythm, instrumental sections, transitions between phrases, etc.

If you grow up listening to this kind of a music, your own music in your adult years tends to reflect the same qualities. The simplicity of rhythm. The alluringly simple tunes. The “hummability quotient.” (You don’t want to focus on intricate patterns of melody in devotional music; you want it to be so simple that minimal mental exertion is involved in rendering it, so that your mental energy can quietly transition towards your spiritual quest and experiences.) Etc.

I am not saying that the reason Ravi’s music is so great is because he listened his father sing “bhajan”s. If this were true, there would be tens of thousands of music composers having talents comparable to Ravi’s. But the fact is that Ravi was a genius—a self-taught genius, in fact. (He never received any formal training in music ever.) But what I am saying is that if you do have the musical ability, having this kind of a family environment would leave its mark. Definitely.

Of course, this all was just a conjecture. Check it out and see if it holds or not.

… May be I should convert this “note” in a separate post by itself. Would be easier to keep track of it. … Some other time. … I have to work on QM; after all, exactly only half the month remains now. … Bye for now. …


Back on the ‘net!

Hushshshsh… Finally I am back on the ‘net (I mean to say, in a real way—not via smartphone). But it’s not after having the broken laptop repaired. On the contrary, it seems as if it’s no longer viable to revive my broken laptop.

So, right now, I am writing this post using an even older laptop that I had. I dug it up from the cupboard, and revived it.

Actually, you can’t call it a laptop; even the manufacturer called it a notebook (the 2008 model Compaq Presario C700, 32-bit Intel Core Duo @ 1.83 GHz, 1 GB RAM). I used to use about a decade ago. All my PhD time programs and data were sitting on it. (The thesis had been written and submitted even earlier, even before I bought this notebook; it was written on a desktop I had back then. However, after submitting thesis, it took them 2 years to arrange for the defence. That’s how, it was on this machine that I had prepared my final defence slides.)

It was a dual boot machine, with one partition running XP, and the other, Vista. I had forgotten the password of the Vista, but fortunately, not of the XP.

The trouble with XP was that both the Mozilla and Internet Explorer installed on it had already become absolutely obsolete. Also Java. (The support for these software had vanished by 2014, I now gathered.) The browsers were so old that they couldn’t handle even simplest of today’s https requests—the SSL layer itself must have been too old. So, I couldn’t have used that OS even for just surfing on the ‘net.

So, what I did over the past couple of days was to first take a backup of my PhD-time data. Then, I proceeded to reformat the whole hard disk, and installed Lubuntu 18.04.1 on it.

Yes, Lubuntu does manage to run even on a 32-bit 1 GB machine. However, even with this comparatively light-weight OS, there is enormous disk-thrashing, particularly if I try to use a programming IDE. (After bootup, the OS by itself eats up something like 600–700 MB of RAM.) So far, I’ve tried installing and using PyCharm, Spyder and VSCode. They all do run, but very, very slowly. Sometimes, you have to even wait for a minute or so just for a context-switch between two processes (say, the browser and the IDE).

So, looks like despite all my valiant tries, this machine isn’t going to be useful for my ANN studies; it would be usable only for browsing. … May be I should borrow money and buy a new laptop….

But one way or the other, this decade-old machine still is better, much much better, than my new (late-2017 times) smart-phone. … As I said recently, the smart-phone is a bad idea. …

… Anyway, now that I am on the ‘net (can use a real keyboard), I should be back pretty soon, say tomorrow or the day after, with something which is much more exciting. That’s a promise. So, bye for now, but stay tuned.


A song I like:
(Marathi) “ekaach yaa janmi jaNu…”
Music: Sudhir Phadke
Lyrics: Sudhir Moghe
Singer: Asha Bhosale

[Usually, when you say “song,” what you usually mean is the basic tune. OK, sometimes, first the words and then the tune. However, this song is odd.

The real beauty of this song lies not in any one of its elements but in the way it unfolds—the way the music composer leads you through an interplay between various musical phrases and the lyrical ones. Especially noteworthy are the violin pieces which transition you from the stanza to the refrain and back. Also noteworthy is the interplay between the Western and the Indian instruments…

So, what rules here is not just the tune, not just the words, not just the orchestration, and not just the rendering in the voice by the singer. Instead, it is the skillfully arranged interplay between all these elements which truly gives the defining character to this song and makes it so beautiful.

So, it’s the music composer who really stands out here, even if the entire team is outstanding… Or so I believe. … Anyway, bye for now. ]

[May be a little streamlining, later on.]

Absolutely Random Notings on QM—Part 2: LOL!

I intend to aperiodically update this post whenever I run into the more “interesting” write-ups about QM and/or quantum physicists. Accordingly, I will mention the dates on which I update this post.

I will return back to Heisenberg and Schrodinger in the next part of this series. But in the meanwhile, enjoy the “inaugaral” link below.


1. Post first published on 08 July 2018, 13:28 hrs IST with the following “interesting” write-up:

Wiki on “Fundamental Fysiks [sic] Group”: [^]


A Song I Like:

(English, “Western”): “old turkey buzzard…” from the movie “MacKenna’s Gold”
[I here mostly copy-paste, dear gentlemen, for, while I had enjoyed the song especially during the usual turbulent teens, I have not had the pleasure to locate the source of the same–back then, or ever. Hence relying on the ‘net.[Oh, BTW, it requires another post on the movie itself, though! [Just remind me, that’s all!]]]
Music: Quincy Jones
Lyrics: Freddy Douglass
Singer: Jose Feliciano

 

 

Yes I know it!

Note: A long update was posted on 12th December 2017, 11:35 IST.


This post is spurred by my browsing of certain twitter feeds of certain pop-sci. writers.

The URL being highlighted—and it would be, say, “negligible,” but for the reputation of the Web domain name on which it appears—is this: [^].


I want to remind you that I know the answers to all the essential quantum mysteries.

Not only that, I also want to remind you that I can discuss about them, in person.

It’s just that my circumstances—past, and present (though I don’t know about future)—which compel me to say, definitely, that I am not available for writing it down for you (i.e. for the layman) whether here or elsewhere, as of now. Neither am I available for discussions on Skype, or via video conferencing, or with whatever “remoting” mode you have in mind. Uh… Yes… WhatsApp? Include it, too. Or something—anything—like that. Whether such requests come from some millionaire Indian in USA (and there are tons of them out there), or otherwise. Nope. A flat no is the answer for all such requests. They are out of question, bounds… At least for now.

… Things may change in future, but at least for the time being, the discussions would have to be with those who already have studied (the non-relativistic) quantum physics as it is taught in universities, up to graduate (PhD) level.

And, you have to have discussions in person. That’s the firm condition being set (for the gain of their knowledge 🙂 ).


Just wanted to remind you, that’s all!


Update on 12th December 2017, 11:35 AM IST:

I have moved the update to a new post.

 


A Song I Like:

(Western, Instrumental) “Berlin Melody”
Credits: Billy Vaughn

[The same 45 RPM thingie [as in here [^], and here [^]] . … I was always unsure whether I liked this one better or the “Come September” one. … Guess, after the n-th thought, that it was this one. There is an odd-even thing about it. For odd ‘n” I think this one is better. For even ‘n’, I think the “Come September” is better.

… And then, there also are a few more musical goodies which came my way during that vacation, and I will make sure that they find their way to you too….

Actually, it’s not the simple odd-even thing. The maths here is more complicated than just the binary logic. It’s an n-ary logic. And, I am “equally” divided among them all. (4+ decades later, I still remain divided.)… (But perhaps the “best” of them was a Marathi one, though it clearly showed a best sort of a learning coming from also the Western music. I will share it the next time.)]


[As usual, may be, another revision [?]… Is it due? Yes, one was due. Have edited streamlined the main post, and then, also added a long update on 12th December 2017, as noted above.]