“shoonya. … shoonyaatoon he jag utpanna zaale.”

(Marathi) “shoonya. …shoonyaatoon he jag utpanna zaale.”

That’s what our (retard/retarded/idiotic/idiot/moronic/cretin-some/even worse, but mostly more European-looking, e.g., “goraa”-looking by skin-color (etc.) than otherwise) Brahmins have always told us—all of them. And, our casteist-Brahmins have always taken the fullest advantage of the same. Especially if they went to an IIT to get a JPBTI. (What makes you think that attending IIT is enough to eradicate caste-ism out of one?)

An English translation of “shoonya”: the Zero/the Naught.

An English translation of the full statement: “The world [actually, thereby meaning, the entire universe] came into being from the Zero / the Naught.”

Always pick this one up for your meditation, even just for deep thought (and not a systematically trained meditation), whenever you think of the casteist-Brahmins, especially those from Pune, India (my birth-place and home-town).

… And you will do that, won’t you? [And, don’t say back: “But I don’t think of them!”]


Here is one of the zillion references to the position. (Pune casteist-Brahmins (rich and all) are emphatically not alone.): [^].


Update on 2019.06.12 14:59

Turns out that this post has come out to be a bit too rant-some for my liking. Also, when I wrote it last night, I thought that the philosophic position from which I wrote it would be clear enough! Yes, I really did think so, last night! But this morning, I figured out that it wasn’t so. Further, the issue is also is of a great philosophic importance. So, today, let me note at least the bare essentials of the philosophic analysis which had gone before I wrote the above post.

The quote actually commits only one error, but it also paves a way for another, grave, error. They in turn lead to a lot of other errors, including legitimizing the pure evil of casteism. Let me explain how.

Consider the quote again: The universe came into being from the Zero / the Naught.

The first error—one that is more easy to pick out—is that some precondition is being prescribed for the entire universe, i.e., for Existence as such. That’s all that the quote by itself states.

Since this is a metaphysical statement, and not mathematical, The Zero here means Non-Existence. So, no, the Zero here does not by itself mean some supposed Mystical Consciousness that created the Existence.

But note the context here. Since the concept of Existence is the most fundamental one of all, since it encompasses literally everything that ever exists, has ever existed or will ever exist, even just the simple device of importing into an argument a contra to Existence, an alternative to it, and according this alternative the same epistemological status as that of Existence, by itself leads to horrible consequences. The act is horrendous only because the concept of Existence is so fundamental—it’s the most fundamental concept. Given the proper hierarchical place of the concept of Existence, positing something—anything—alternative it, therefore, by itself has the effect of making the entire knowledge-hierarchy superfluous, with an alternative being thereby being made to lie at an even more fundamental level.

So, the issue subtly shifts, without the speaker having to explicitly name it, to a question of figuring out what this alternative could possibly be.

Given the nature of the things, the only alternative that could possibly make any sense to anyone would be: some or the other consciousness. The road is therefore paved for legitimizing the primacy of consciousness—a hallmark of mysticism.

Since men do sense, through a direct grasp, that their consciousness is not so capable that they could make Existence dance in accordance to their wishes, and since the proceedings now are being conducted firmly in the abstract terms, and since the layman is unable to counter it at the same level of abstraction, a further road now gets paved, viz., that for welcoming some mystical, Super-etc.-Consciousness.

All that the quoted formulation seeks to do is for you to grant legitimacy to this mystical formulation, viz., there is some mystical Super-Consciousness that preceded, and thus produced, Existence.

Got the trick?

Study the method of the Brahmins. They don’t name the issues directly. And especially if are like the irrational Brahmins of India, they also ensure that the entire proceedings occurs at an abstract level. And that makes it worse.

A mystic is always bad. But he could be as lacking of consequences as some random trickster who performs road-side shows. The mystic becomes bad, horrendous, only when he practices his art in the intellectual, abstract terms, in this world. A “sanyaasee” who retires to Himalayas doesn’t usually engage in abstract intellectual matters, and anyway is removed from the mundane world. So, any mysticism that he carries too doesn’t matter to the rest of us.

But a Brahmin who stays in the mainstream society, and intellectualizes, does matter. Afterall, in India, traditionally, the only men who were charged with (and allowed) dealing with abstractions were Brahmins.

The membership to this group was, for at least a couple of millenia if not more, on the basis of birth alone. … Sure, not all people born into a given caste are bad. But that is besides the point. The premises and the fact of abstract intellectualizations, and their consequences, is what we are concerned with, here.

So, once again carefully observe the role of abstractions—and the consequences of making, and keeping, mysticism abstract.

The Indian term for the aforementioned kind of a mystical Super-Consciousness—one that precedes Existence—was (and is): “bramha” (and not “bramhaa”). A “braamhaNa” was one who had a knowledge of (and therefore had a special access to) the Super-Consciousness that is the “bramha”. That’s what the literal meaning of the Sanskrit term is. “Brahmin” is just an Anglicization of “braamhaNa”.

If everything in existence is produced by “bramha”, so is every living being—including every human being.

Since all the proceedings are conducted without physical violence, and purely and perfectly at an intellectual plane alone, one “desirable” side-effect it produces is that the layman does not come to doubt that the intellectualizations being offered are not part of rationally acquired and valid knowledge.

It is an objective fact that reason is man’s fundamental means of survival. It therefore is an objective fact that knowledge does mean efficacy, a mastery over the matters it subsumes. In any demonstrable hierarchy of skills, knowledge—properly including also its application—is the most valuable one. It’s a crown skill. (Aristotle called rationality the crown-virtue.)

However, in India, it always was only a Brahmin who was charged with all matters concerning knowledge. And, membership to the class of intellectuals was via birth. That’s what casteism basically boils down to.

Therefore, any random guy, so long as he was born into the Brahmin caste, would necessarily have access to “bramha”. If all stars and mountains and rivers and trees and cats… are produced by “brahma”, and if all people too are produced by “brahma”, and if only a caste-Brahmins has access to “bramha”, and if a caste-Brahmin still was a human being too, then, given the fact that the position of knowledge as a crown-virtue is not being directly challenged at all, is it any surprise that every random caste-Brahmin guy would have to be taken as having “come” from the head of the Super-Consciousness that is the “bramha”?

(Don’t ask me what the term “head—a bodily organ—of a Super Consciousness” mean. I don’t know. Chances are, they might locate the actual living bodies of all caste-Brahmins to constitute the supposed head of that Super Consciousness, too. Who knows. But they certainly are that capable.)

While writing this update, I had said that there were several errors implicit in that statement. The one easiest to make out was: Denying the primacy of Existence. The consequent error, I said, was not as easy to make out. The reason it is difficult to figure out is that it is not directly named in that quote (i.e. the title of this post). But the second error becomes easy to grasp once you figure out that it is Brahmins who have always repeated this quote. The second error actually is a transformation of the first error. It is: the Primacy of “bramha”’s Consciousness. Introduce the third error: That only caste-Brahmin has access to “bramha”, and the lethal weapon is completed.

And what is “brahma”, you still ask? Easy enough. In practical terms, it means whatever it is that happens to constitute the contents of consciousness of any of the caste-Brahmins—including casteist-Brahmins.

And yes, there is ample evidence—for those willing to see it—that caste-Brahminism is not only wide-spread in Indian IT industry (especially that in Pune), but also that it has in fact been on the upswing for quite some time by now. I, for one, certainly do believe that if I were a Brahmin, I would have progressed much more rapidly, far more easily, in the Indian IT industry. At any rate, I wouldn’t go jobless even as irrational Brahmins in Pune kept on amassing money.

To conclude: Yes, it was a rant. But no, it wasn’t just a rant.


No songs section for this time around. I go jobless.

BTW, for cross-reference, cf. an American poem from (I guess) the mid-20th century: “The world began when I was born…”

 

Advertisements

Further on QM, and on changing tracks over to Data Science

OK. As decided, I took a short trip to IIT Bombay, and saw a couple of professors of physics, for very brief face-to-face interactions on the 28th evening.

No chalk-work at the blackboard had to be done, because both of them were very busy—but also quick, really very quick, in getting to the meat of the matter.


As to the first professor I saw, I knew beforehand that he wouldn’t be very enthusiastic with any alternatives to anything in the mainstream QM.

He was already engrossed in a discussion with someone (who looked like a PhD student) when I knocked at the door of his cabin. The prof immediately mentioned that he has to finish (what looked like a few tons of) pending work items, before going away on a month-long trip just after a couple of days! But, hey, as I said (in my last post), directly barging into a professor’s cabin has always done wonders for me! So, despite his having some heavy^{heavy} schedule, he still motioned me to sit down for a quick and short interaction.

The three of us (the prof, his student, and me) then immediately had a very highly compressed discussion for some 15-odd minutes. As expected, the discussion turned out to be not only very rapid, and also quite uneven, because there were so many abrupt changes to the sub-topics and sub-issues, as they were being brought up and dispatched in quick succession. …

It was not an ideal time to introduce my new approach, and so, I didn’t. I did mention, however, that I was trying to develop some such a thing. The professor was of the opinion that if you come up with a way to do faster simulations, it would always be welcome, but if you are going to argue against the well-established laws, then… [he just shook head].

I told him that I was clear, very clear on one point. Suppose, I said, that I have a complex-valued field that is defined only over the physical 3D, and suppose further that my new approach (which involves such a 3D field) does work out. Then, suppose further that I get essentially the same results as the mainstream QM does.

In such a case, I said, I am going to say that here is a possibility of looking at it as a real physical mechanism underlying the QM theory.

And if people even then say that because it is in some way different from the established laws, therefore it is not to be taken seriously, then I am very clear that I am going to say: “You go your way and I will go mine.”

But of course, I further added, that I still don’t know yet how the calculations are done in the mainstream QM for the interacting electrons—that is, without invoking simplifying approximations (such as the fixed nucleus). I wanted to see how these calculations are done using the computational modeling approach (not the perturbation theory).

It was at this point that the professor really got the sense of what I was trying to get at. He then remarked that variational formulations are capable enough, and proceeded to outline some of their features. To my query as to what kind of an ansatz they use, and what kind of parameters are involved in inducing the variations, he mentioned Chebyshev polynomials and a few other things. The student mentioned the Slater determinants. Then the professor remarked that the particulars of the ansatz and the particulars of the variational techniques were not so crucial because all these techniques ultimately boil down to just diagonalizing a matrix. Somehow, I instinctively got the idea that he hasn’t been very much into numerical simulations himself, which turned out to be the case. In fact he immediately said so himself: “I don’t do wavefunctions. [Someone else from the same department] does it.” I decided to see this other professor the next day, because it was already evening (almost approaching 6 PM or so).

A few wonderful clarifications later, it was time for me to leave, and so I thanked the professor profusely for accommodating me. The poor fellow didn’t even have the time to notice my gratitude; he had already switched back to his interrupted discussion with the student.

But yes, the meeting was fruitful to me because the prof did get the “nerve” of the issue right, and in fact also gave me two very helpful papers to study, both of them being review articles. After coming home, I have now realized that while one of them is quite relevant to me, the other one is absolutely god-damn relevant!


Anyway, after coming out of the department on that evening, I was thinking of calling my friend to let him know that the purpose of the visit to the campus was over, and thus I was totally free. While thinking about calling him and walking through the parking lot, I just abruptly noticed a face that suddenly flashed something recognizable to me. It was this same second professor who “does wavefunctions!”

I had planned on seeing him the next day, but here he was, right in front me, walking towards his car in a leisurely mood. Translated, it meant: he was very much free of all his students, and so was available for a chat with me! Right now!! Of course, I had never had made any acquaintance with him in the past. I had only browsed through his home page once in the recent times, and so could immediately make out the face, that’s all. He was just about to open the door of his car when I approached him and introduced myself. There followed another intense bout of discussions, for another 10-odd minutes.

This second prof has done numerical simulations himself, and so, he was even faster in getting a sense of what kind of ideas I was toying with. Once again, I told him that I was trying for some new ideas but didn’t get any deeper into my approach, because I myself still don’t know whether my approach will produce the same results as the mainstream QM does or not. In any case, knowing the mainstream method of handling these things was crucial, I said.

I told him how, despite my extensive Internet searches, I had not found suitable material for doing calculations. He then said that he will give me the details about a book. I should study this book first, and if there are still some difficulties or some discussions to be had, then he would be available, but the discussion would then have to progress in reference to what is already given in that book. Neat idea, this one was, perfect by me. And turns out that the book he suggested was neat—absolutely perfectly relevant to my needs, background as well as preparation.


And with that ends this small story of this short visit to IIT Bombay. I went there with a purpose, and returned with one 50 page-long and very tightly written review paper, a second paper of some 20+ tightly written pages, and a reference to an entire PG-level book (about 500 pages). All of this material absolutely unknown to me despite my searches, and as it seems as of today, all of it being of utmost relevance to me, my new ideas.


But I have to get into Data Science first. Else I cannot survive. (I have been borrowing money to fend off the credit card minimum due amounts every month.)

So, I have decided to take a rest for today, and from tomorrow onwards, or may be a day later—i.e., starting from the “shubh muhurat” (auspicious time) of the April Fool’s day, I will begin my full-time pursuit of Data Science, with all that new material on QM only to be studied on a part-time basis. For today, however, I am just going to be doing a bit of a time-pass here and there. That’s how this post got written.

Take care, and wish you the same kind of luck as I had in spotting that second prof just like that in the parking lot. … If my approach works, then I know who to contact first with my results, for informal comments on them. … I wish you this same kind of a luck…

Work hard, and bye for now.


A song I like
(Marathi) “dhunda_ madhumati raat re, naath re…”
Music: Master Krishnarao
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Lyrics: G. D. Madgulkar

[A Marathi classic. Credits are listed in a purely random order. A version that seems official (released by Rajshri Marathi) is here: [^] . However, somehow, the first stanza is not complete in it.

As to the set shown in this (and all such) movies, right up to, say the movie “Bajirao-Mastani,” I have—and always had—an issue. The open wide spaces for the palaces they show in the movies are completely unrealistic, given the technology of those days (and the actual remains of the palaces that are easy to be recalled by anyone). The ancients (whether here in India or at any other place) simply didn’t have the kind of technology which is needed in order to build such hugely wide internal (covered) spaces. Neitehr the so-called “Roman arch” (invented millenia earlier in India, I gather), nor the use of the monolithic stones for girders could possibly be enough to generate such huge spans. Idiots. If they can’t get even simple calculations right, that’s only to be expected—from them. But if they can’t even recall the visual details of the spans actually seen for the old palaces, that is simply inexcusable. Absolutely thorough morons, these movie-makers must be.]