“shoonya. … shoonyaatoon he jag utpanna zaale.”

(Marathi) “shoonya. …shoonyaatoon he jag utpanna zaale.”

That’s what our (retard/retarded/idiotic/idiot/moronic/cretin-some/even worse, but mostly more European-looking, e.g., “goraa”-looking by skin-color (etc.) than otherwise) Brahmins have always told us—all of them. And, our casteist-Brahmins have always taken the fullest advantage of the same. Especially if they went to an IIT to get a JPBTI. (What makes you think that attending IIT is enough to eradicate caste-ism out of one?)

An English translation of “shoonya”: the Zero/the Naught.

An English translation of the full statement: “The world [actually, thereby meaning, the entire universe] came into being from the Zero / the Naught.”

Always pick this one up for your meditation, even just for deep thought (and not a systematically trained meditation), whenever you think of the casteist-Brahmins, especially those from Pune, India (my birth-place and home-town).

… And you will do that, won’t you? [And, don’t say back: “But I don’t think of them!”]


Here is one of the zillion references to the position. (Pune casteist-Brahmins (rich and all) are emphatically not alone.): [^].


Update on 2019.06.12 14:59

Turns out that this post has come out to be a bit too rant-some for my liking. Also, when I wrote it last night, I thought that the philosophic position from which I wrote it would be clear enough! Yes, I really did think so, last night! But this morning, I figured out that it wasn’t so. Further, the issue is also is of a great philosophic importance. So, today, let me note at least the bare essentials of the philosophic analysis which had gone before I wrote the above post.

The quote actually commits only one error, but it also paves a way for another, grave, error. They in turn lead to a lot of other errors, including legitimizing the pure evil of casteism. Let me explain how.

Consider the quote again: The universe came into being from the Zero / the Naught.

The first error—one that is more easy to pick out—is that some precondition is being prescribed for the entire universe, i.e., for Existence as such. That’s all that the quote by itself states.

Since this is a metaphysical statement, and not mathematical, The Zero here means Non-Existence. So, no, the Zero here does not by itself mean some supposed Mystical Consciousness that created the Existence.

But note the context here. Since the concept of Existence is the most fundamental one of all, since it encompasses literally everything that ever exists, has ever existed or will ever exist, even just the simple device of importing into an argument a contra to Existence, an alternative to it, and according this alternative the same epistemological status as that of Existence, by itself leads to horrible consequences. The act is horrendous only because the concept of Existence is so fundamental—it’s the most fundamental concept. Given the proper hierarchical place of the concept of Existence, positing something—anything—alternative it, therefore, by itself has the effect of making the entire knowledge-hierarchy superfluous, with an alternative being thereby being made to lie at an even more fundamental level.

So, the issue subtly shifts, without the speaker having to explicitly name it, to a question of figuring out what this alternative could possibly be.

Given the nature of the things, the only alternative that could possibly make any sense to anyone would be: some or the other consciousness. The road is therefore paved for legitimizing the primacy of consciousness—a hallmark of mysticism.

Since men do sense, through a direct grasp, that their consciousness is not so capable that they could make Existence dance in accordance to their wishes, and since the proceedings now are being conducted firmly in the abstract terms, and since the layman is unable to counter it at the same level of abstraction, a further road now gets paved, viz., that for welcoming some mystical, Super-etc.-Consciousness.

All that the quoted formulation seeks to do is for you to grant legitimacy to this mystical formulation, viz., there is some mystical Super-Consciousness that preceded, and thus produced, Existence.

Got the trick?

Study the method of the Brahmins. They don’t name the issues directly. And especially if are like the irrational Brahmins of India, they also ensure that the entire proceedings occurs at an abstract level. And that makes it worse.

A mystic is always bad. But he could be as lacking of consequences as some random trickster who performs road-side shows. The mystic becomes bad, horrendous, only when he practices his art in the intellectual, abstract terms, in this world. A “sanyaasee” who retires to Himalayas doesn’t usually engage in abstract intellectual matters, and anyway is removed from the mundane world. So, any mysticism that he carries too doesn’t matter to the rest of us.

But a Brahmin who stays in the mainstream society, and intellectualizes, does matter. Afterall, in India, traditionally, the only men who were charged with (and allowed) dealing with abstractions were Brahmins.

The membership to this group was, for at least a couple of millenia if not more, on the basis of birth alone. … Sure, not all people born into a given caste are bad. But that is besides the point. The premises and the fact of abstract intellectualizations, and their consequences, is what we are concerned with, here.

So, once again carefully observe the role of abstractions—and the consequences of making, and keeping, mysticism abstract.

The Indian term for the aforementioned kind of a mystical Super-Consciousness—one that precedes Existence—was (and is): “bramha” (and not “bramhaa”). A “braamhaNa” was one who had a knowledge of (and therefore had a special access to) the Super-Consciousness that is the “bramha”. That’s what the literal meaning of the Sanskrit term is. “Brahmin” is just an Anglicization of “braamhaNa”.

If everything in existence is produced by “bramha”, so is every living being—including every human being.

Since all the proceedings are conducted without physical violence, and purely and perfectly at an intellectual plane alone, one “desirable” side-effect it produces is that the layman does not come to doubt that the intellectualizations being offered are not part of rationally acquired and valid knowledge.

It is an objective fact that reason is man’s fundamental means of survival. It therefore is an objective fact that knowledge does mean efficacy, a mastery over the matters it subsumes. In any demonstrable hierarchy of skills, knowledge—properly including also its application—is the most valuable one. It’s a crown skill. (Aristotle called rationality the crown-virtue.)

However, in India, it always was only a Brahmin who was charged with all matters concerning knowledge. And, membership to the class of intellectuals was via birth. That’s what casteism basically boils down to.

Therefore, any random guy, so long as he was born into the Brahmin caste, would necessarily have access to “bramha”. If all stars and mountains and rivers and trees and cats… are produced by “brahma”, and if all people too are produced by “brahma”, and if only a caste-Brahmins has access to “bramha”, and if a caste-Brahmin still was a human being too, then, given the fact that the position of knowledge as a crown-virtue is not being directly challenged at all, is it any surprise that every random caste-Brahmin guy would have to be taken as having “come” from the head of the Super-Consciousness that is the “bramha”?

(Don’t ask me what the term “head—a bodily organ—of a Super Consciousness” mean. I don’t know. Chances are, they might locate the actual living bodies of all caste-Brahmins to constitute the supposed head of that Super Consciousness, too. Who knows. But they certainly are that capable.)

While writing this update, I had said that there were several errors implicit in that statement. The one easiest to make out was: Denying the primacy of Existence. The consequent error, I said, was not as easy to make out. The reason it is difficult to figure out is that it is not directly named in that quote (i.e. the title of this post). But the second error becomes easy to grasp once you figure out that it is Brahmins who have always repeated this quote. The second error actually is a transformation of the first error. It is: the Primacy of “bramha”’s Consciousness. Introduce the third error: That only caste-Brahmin has access to “bramha”, and the lethal weapon is completed.

And what is “brahma”, you still ask? Easy enough. In practical terms, it means whatever it is that happens to constitute the contents of consciousness of any of the caste-Brahmins—including casteist-Brahmins.

And yes, there is ample evidence—for those willing to see it—that caste-Brahminism is not only wide-spread in Indian IT industry (especially that in Pune), but also that it has in fact been on the upswing for quite some time by now. I, for one, certainly do believe that if I were a Brahmin, I would have progressed much more rapidly, far more easily, in the Indian IT industry. At any rate, I wouldn’t go jobless even as irrational Brahmins in Pune kept on amassing money.

To conclude: Yes, it was a rant. But no, it wasn’t just a rant.


No songs section for this time around. I go jobless.

BTW, for cross-reference, cf. an American poem from (I guess) the mid-20th century: “The world began when I was born…”

 

My new approach to QM—an update, and a request (May 2019)

This post has reference to my earlier post of 30th March 2019, here [^]. Being busy mainly with learning Data Science, I didn’t subsequently find the time to systematically study the papers and the book which were suggested by the IIT Bombay professors back in March-end.


However, in the meanwhile, thinking about the whole issue independently (and on a part-time basis), I have come to work through a detailed scheme for calculating the wavefunctions for the case of a 1D helium atom.

In particular, the abstract case I have worked through is the following:

A single helium atom placed in a 1D domain of a finite length, and with either reflecting boundary conditions (i.e. infinite potential walls) at the two ends (i.e. a 1D box), or possibly also with periodic boundary conditions imposed at the two ends (i.e. an infinite 1D lattice of 1D helium atoms). The problem is to find the energy eigenstates for the system wavefunction, assuming that the electrons do interact with each other.

The electrons are spinless. However, note, I have now addressed the case of the interacting electrons too.


I have not performed the actual simulations, though they can be done “any time.”

Yet, before proceeding to write the code, I would like to show the scheme itself to some computational quantum chemist/physicist, and have a bit of a to-and-fro regarding how they usually handle it in the mainstream QM/QChem, and about the commonality and differences (even the very basic reasonableness or otherwise) of my proposed scheme.

I can even go further and say that I have now got stuck at this point.


I will also continue to remain stuck at this same point unless one of the following two things happens: (i) a quantum chemist having a good knowledge of the computer simulation methods, volunteers to review my scheme and offer suggestions, or (ii) I myself study and digest a couple of text-books (of 500+ pages) and a few relevant papers (including those suggested by the IIT Bombay professors).

The second alternative is not feasible right now, simply because I don’t have enough time at hand. I am now busy with learning data science, and must continue to do so, so that I can land a job ASAP. (It’s been more than a year that I have been out of a job.)


So, if you are knowledgeable about this topic (the abstract case I am dealing with above, viz., that of 1D helium atom with spinless but interacting electrons), and also want to help me, then I request you to please see if you can volunteer just a bit of your time.

If no one comes to help me, it could take a much longer period of time for me to work through it all purely on my own—anywhere from 6–8 months to a year, or as is easily possible, even much more time—may be a couple of years or so, too. … Remember, I will also be working in a very highly competitive area of data science too, during all this time.

On the other hand, to someone who has enough knowledge of this matter, it wouldn’t be very strenuous at all. He only has to review the scheme and offer comments, and generally remain available for help, that’s all.

(It would be quite like someone approaching me for some informal guidance on FEM simulation of some engineering case. Even if I might not have modeled some particular case myself in the past, say a case of some fluid-structure interaction, I still know that I could always act as a sounding board and offer some general help to such a guy. I also know that doing isn’t going to be very taxing on me, that it’s not going to take too much of my own time. The situation here is quite similar. The quantum chemist/physicist doesn’t have to exert himself too much. I am confident of this part.)

So, there. See if you can help me out yourself, or suggest someone suitable to me. Thanks in advance.


A song I like:
(Marathi) “vaaTa sampataa sampenaa…”
Lyrics: Devakinandan Saaraswat
Music: Dattaa Daavajekar
Singer: Jayawant Kulkarni

Why is the research on the foundations of QM necessary?

Why is the research on the foundations of QM necessary? … This post is meant to hold together some useful links touching on various aspects of this question.


Bob Doyle

He has interests in philosophy but has a PhD in astrophysics from Harvard. He maintains not just an isolated page on the measurement problem, but a whole compendium of them, which together touch on all issues related QM—and these form just a part of his Web site which also deals with many issues from philosophy proper like free-will, mind, knowledge, values, etc. Added attraction: He also keeps papers of historical relevance (like Schrodinger’s paper on quantum jumps, for instance).

His page on the measurement problem is very fascinating. He mentions all the relevant issues (including giving links to the topics), summarizes all the important positions in a very accurate manner (quoting passages from historically important papers). You are bound to get just the right kind of a perspective on this problem if you refer to this page and (what is easy to state): “all the references therein”!. Here is the page: [^] (which I had noted in my Twitter feed on 25 August 2019).

[This section added on 2019.09.18 07:43 IST]


Sabine Hossenfelder:

See her blog post: “Good Problems in the Foundations of Physics” [^]. Go through the entirety of the first half of the post, and then make sure to check out the paragraph of the title “The Measurement Problem” from her list.

Not to be missed: Do check out the comment by Peter Shor, here [^], and Hossenfelder’s reply to it, here [^]. … If you are familiar with the outline of my new approach [^], then it would be very easy to see why I must have instantaneously found her answer to be so absolutely wonderful! … Being a reply to a comment, she must have written it much on the fly. Even then, she not only correctly points out the fact that the measurement process must be nonlinear in nature, she also mentions that you have to give a “bottom-up” model for the Instrument. …Wow! Simply, wow!!

Update (2019.09.18 07:43 IST): Also see a post she wrote a few months later: “The Problem with Quantum Measurements”, [^]. It generated 450 comments, but not many were too inspiring!


Lee Smolin:

Here is one of the most lucid and essence-capturing accounts concerning this topic that I have ever run into [^]. Smolin wrote it in response to the Edge Question, 2013 edition. It wonderfully captures the very essence of the confusions which were created and / or faced by all the leading mainstream physicists of the past—the confusions which none of them could get rid of—with the list including even such Nobel-laureates as Bohr, Einstein, Heisenberg, Pauli, de Broglie, Schrodinger, Dirac, and others. [Yes, in case you read the names too rapidly: this list does include Einstein too!]


Sean Carroll:

He explains at his blog how a lack of good answers on the foundational issues in QM leads to “the most embarrassing graph in modern physics” [^]. This post was further discussed in several other posts in the blogosphere. The survey paper which prompted Carroll’s post can be found at arXiv, here [^]. Check out the concept maps given in the paper, too. Phillip Ball’s coverage in the Nature News of this same paper can be found here [^].


Adrian Kent:

See his pop-sci level paper “Quantum theory’s reality problem,” at arXiv [^]. He originally wrote it for Aeon in 2014, and then revised it in 2018 while posting at arXiv. Also notable is his c. 2000 paper: “Night thoughts of a quantum physicist,” Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. A, vol. 358, 75–87. As to the fifth section (“Postscript”) of this second paper, I am fully confident that no one would have to wait either until the year 2999, or for any one of those imagined extraterrestrial colleagues to arrive on the scene. Further, I am also fully confident that no mechanical “colleagues” are ever going to be around.

[Added on 2019.05.05 15:41 IST]


…What Else?:

What else but the Wiki!… See here [^], and then, also here [^].


OK. This all should make for an adequate response, at least for the time being, to those physicists (or physics professors) who tend to think that the foundational issues do not make for “real” physics, that it is a non-issue. … However, for obvious reasons, this post will also remain permanently under updates…

Revision History:

2019.04.15: First published
2019.04.16: Some editing/streamlining
2019.05.05: Added the paper by Prof. Kent.
2019.09.18: Added the section on Bob Doyle. Added a recent post by Sabine Hossenfelder.

 

Further on QM, and on changing tracks over to Data Science

OK. As decided, I took a short trip to IIT Bombay, and saw a couple of professors of physics, for very brief face-to-face interactions on the 28th evening.

No chalk-work at the blackboard had to be done, because both of them were very busy—but also quick, really very quick, in getting to the meat of the matter.


As to the first professor I saw, I knew beforehand that he wouldn’t be very enthusiastic with any alternatives to anything in the mainstream QM.

He was already engrossed in a discussion with someone (who looked like a PhD student) when I knocked at the door of his cabin. The prof immediately mentioned that he has to finish (what looked like a few tons of) pending work items, before going away on a month-long trip just after a couple of days! But, hey, as I said (in my last post), directly barging into a professor’s cabin has always done wonders for me! So, despite his having some heavy^{heavy} schedule, he still motioned me to sit down for a quick and short interaction.

The three of us (the prof, his student, and me) then immediately had a very highly compressed discussion for some 15-odd minutes. As expected, the discussion turned out to be not only very rapid, and also quite uneven, because there were so many abrupt changes to the sub-topics and sub-issues, as they were being brought up and dispatched in quick succession. …

It was not an ideal time to introduce my new approach, and so, I didn’t. I did mention, however, that I was trying to develop some such a thing. The professor was of the opinion that if you come up with a way to do faster simulations, it would always be welcome, but if you are going to argue against the well-established laws, then… [he just shook head].

I told him that I was clear, very clear on one point. Suppose, I said, that I have a complex-valued field that is defined only over the physical 3D, and suppose further that my new approach (which involves such a 3D field) does work out. Then, suppose further that I get essentially the same results as the mainstream QM does.

In such a case, I said, I am going to say that here is a possibility of looking at it as a real physical mechanism underlying the QM theory.

And if people even then say that because it is in some way different from the established laws, therefore it is not to be taken seriously, then I am very clear that I am going to say: “You go your way and I will go mine.”

But of course, I further added, that I still don’t know yet how the calculations are done in the mainstream QM for the interacting electrons—that is, without invoking simplifying approximations (such as the fixed nucleus). I wanted to see how these calculations are done using the computational modeling approach (not the perturbation theory).

It was at this point that the professor really got the sense of what I was trying to get at. He then remarked that variational formulations are capable enough, and proceeded to outline some of their features. To my query as to what kind of an ansatz they use, and what kind of parameters are involved in inducing the variations, he mentioned Chebyshev polynomials and a few other things. The student mentioned the Slater determinants. Then the professor remarked that the particulars of the ansatz and the particulars of the variational techniques were not so crucial because all these techniques ultimately boil down to just diagonalizing a matrix. Somehow, I instinctively got the idea that he hasn’t been very much into numerical simulations himself, which turned out to be the case. In fact he immediately said so himself: “I don’t do wavefunctions. [Someone else from the same department] does it.” I decided to see this other professor the next day, because it was already evening (almost approaching 6 PM or so).

A few wonderful clarifications later, it was time for me to leave, and so I thanked the professor profusely for accommodating me. The poor fellow didn’t even have the time to notice my gratitude; he had already switched back to his interrupted discussion with the student.

But yes, the meeting was fruitful to me because the prof did get the “nerve” of the issue right, and in fact also gave me two very helpful papers to study, both of them being review articles. After coming home, I have now realized that while one of them is quite relevant to me, the other one is absolutely god-damn relevant!


Anyway, after coming out of the department on that evening, I was thinking of calling my friend to let him know that the purpose of the visit to the campus was over, and thus I was totally free. While thinking about calling him and walking through the parking lot, I just abruptly noticed a face that suddenly flashed something recognizable to me. It was this same second professor who “does wavefunctions!”

I had planned on seeing him the next day, but here he was, right in front me, walking towards his car in a leisurely mood. Translated, it meant: he was very much free of all his students, and so was available for a chat with me! Right now!! Of course, I had never had made any acquaintance with him in the past. I had only browsed through his home page once in the recent times, and so could immediately make out the face, that’s all. He was just about to open the door of his car when I approached him and introduced myself. There followed another intense bout of discussions, for another 10-odd minutes.

This second prof has done numerical simulations himself, and so, he was even faster in getting a sense of what kind of ideas I was toying with. Once again, I told him that I was trying for some new ideas but didn’t get any deeper into my approach, because I myself still don’t know whether my approach will produce the same results as the mainstream QM does or not. In any case, knowing the mainstream method of handling these things was crucial, I said.

I told him how, despite my extensive Internet searches, I had not found suitable material for doing calculations. He then said that he will give me the details about a book. I should study this book first, and if there are still some difficulties or some discussions to be had, then he would be available, but the discussion would then have to progress in reference to what is already given in that book. Neat idea, this one was, perfect by me. And turns out that the book he suggested was neat—absolutely perfectly relevant to my needs, background as well as preparation.


And with that ends this small story of this short visit to IIT Bombay. I went there with a purpose, and returned with one 50 page-long and very tightly written review paper, a second paper of some 20+ tightly written pages, and a reference to an entire PG-level book (about 500 pages). All of this material absolutely unknown to me despite my searches, and as it seems as of today, all of it being of utmost relevance to me, my new ideas.


But I have to get into Data Science first. Else I cannot survive. (I have been borrowing money to fend off the credit card minimum due amounts every month.)

So, I have decided to take a rest for today, and from tomorrow onwards, or may be a day later—i.e., starting from the “shubh muhurat” (auspicious time) of the April Fool’s day, I will begin my full-time pursuit of Data Science, with all that new material on QM only to be studied on a part-time basis. For today, however, I am just going to be doing a bit of a time-pass here and there. That’s how this post got written.

Take care, and wish you the same kind of luck as I had in spotting that second prof just like that in the parking lot. … If my approach works, then I know who to contact first with my results, for informal comments on them. … I wish you this same kind of a luck…

Work hard, and bye for now.


A song I like
(Marathi) “dhunda_ madhumati raat re, naath re…”
Music: Master Krishnarao
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Lyrics: G. D. Madgulkar

[A Marathi classic. Credits are listed in a purely random order. A version that seems official (released by Rajshri Marathi) is here: [^] . However, somehow, the first stanza is not complete in it.

As to the set shown in this (and all such) movies, right up to, say the movie “Bajirao-Mastani,” I have—and always had—an issue. The open wide spaces for the palaces they show in the movies are completely unrealistic, given the technology of those days (and the actual remains of the palaces that are easy to be recalled by anyone). The ancients (whether here in India or at any other place) simply didn’t have the kind of technology which is needed in order to build such hugely wide internal (covered) spaces. Neitehr the so-called “Roman arch” (invented millenia earlier in India, I gather), nor the use of the monolithic stones for girders could possibly be enough to generate such huge spans. Idiots. If they can’t get even simple calculations right, that’s only to be expected—from them. But if they can’t even recall the visual details of the spans actually seen for the old palaces, that is simply inexcusable. Absolutely thorough morons, these movie-makers must be.]

 

Wrapping up my research on QM—without having to give up on it

Guess I am more or less ready to wrap up my research on QM. Here is the exact status as of today.


1. The status today:

I have convinced myself that my approach (viz. the idea of singular potentials anchored into electronic positions, and with a 3D wave-field) is entirely correct, as far as QM of non-interacting particles is concerned. That is to say, as far as the abstract case of two particles in a 0-potential 1D box, or a less abstract but still hypothetical case of two non-interacting electrons in the helium atom, and similar cases are concerned. (A side note: I have worked exclusively with the spinless electrons. I don’t plan to include spin right away in my development—not even in my first paper on it. Other physicists are welcome to include it, if they wish to, any time they like.)

As to the actual case of two interacting particles (i.e., the interaction term in the Hamiltonian for the helium atom), I think that my approach should come to reproduce the same results as those obtained using the perturbation theory or the variational approach. However, I need to verify this part via discussions with physicists.

All in all, I do think that the task which I had intended to complete (and to cross-check) before this month-end, is already over—and I find that I don’t have to give up on QM (as suspected earlier [^]), because I don’t have to abandon my new approach in the first place.


2. A clarification on what had to be worked out and what had to be left alone:

To me, the crucial part at this stage (i.e., for the second-half of March) was verifying whether working with the two ideas of (i) a 3D wavefield, and (ii) electrons as “particles” having definite positions (or more correctly, as points of singularities in the potential field), still leads to the same mathematical description as in the mainstream (linear) quantum mechanics or not.

I now find that my new approach leads to the same maths—at least for the QM of the non-interacting particles. And further, I also have very definite grounds to believe that my new approach should also work out for two interacting particles (as in the He atom).

The crucial part at this stage (i.e., for the second half of March) didn’t have so much to do with the specific non-linearity which I have proposed earlier, or the details of the measurement process which it implies. Working out the details of these ideas would have been impossible—certainly beyond the capacities of any single physicist, and over such a short period. An entire team of PhD physicists would be needed to tackle the issues arising in pursuing this new approach, and to conduct the simulations to verify it.

BTW, in this context, I do have some definite ideas regarding how to hasten this process of unraveling the many particular aspects of the measurement process. I would share them once physicists show readiness to pursue this new approach. [Just in case I forget about it in future, let me note just a single cue-word for myself: “DFT”.]


3. Regarding revising the Outline document issued earlier:

Of course, the Outline document (which was earlier uploaded at iMechanica, on 11th February 2019) [^] needs to be revised extensively. A good deal of corrections and modifications are in order, and so are quite a few additions to be made too—especially in the sections on ontology and entanglement.

However, I will edit this document at my leisure later; I will not allocate a continuous stretch of time exclusively for this task any more.

In fact, a good idea here would be to abandon that Outline document as is, and to issue a fresh document that deals with only the linear aspects of the theory—with just a sketchy conceptual idea of how the measurement process is supposed to progress in a broad background context. Such a document then could be converted as a good contribution to a good journal like Nature, Science, or PRL.


4. The initial skepticism of the physicists:

Coming to the skepticism shown by the couple of physicists (with whom I had had some discussions by emails), I think that, regardless of their objections (hollers, really speaking!), my main thesis still does hold. It’s they who don’t understand the quantum theory—and let me hasten to add that by the words “quantum theory,” here I emphatically mean the mainstream quantum theory.

It is the mainstream QM which they themselves don’t understood as well as they should. What my new approach then does is to merely uncover some of these weaknesses, that’s all. … Their weakness pertains to a lack of understanding of the 3D \Leftrightarrow 3ND correspondence in general, for any kind of physics: classical or quantum. … Why, I even doubt whether they understand even just the classical vibrations themselves right or not—coupled vibrations under variable potentials, that is—to the extent and depth to which they should.

In short, it is now easy for me to leave their skepticism alone, because I can now clearly see where they failed to get the physics right.


5. Next action-item:

In the near future, I would like to make short trips to some Institutes nearby (viz., in no particular order, one or more of the following: IIT Bombay, IISER Pune, IUCAA Pune, and TIFR Mumbai). I would like to have some face-to-face discussions with physicists on this one single topic: the interaction term in the Hamiltonian for the helium atom. The discussions will be held strictly in the context that is common to us, i.e., in reference to the higher-dimensional Hilbert space of the mainstream QM.

In case no one from these Institutes responds to my requests, I plan to go and see the heads of these Institutes (i.e. Deans and Directors)—in person, if necessary. I might also undertake other action items. However, I also sincerely hope and think that such things would not at all be necessary. There is a reason why I think so. Professors may or may not respond to an outsider’s emails, but they do entertain you if you just show up in their cabin—and if you yourself are smart, courteous, direct, and well… also experienced enough. And if you are capable of holding discussions on the “common” grounds alone, viz. in terms of the linear, mainstream QM as formulated in the higher-dimensional spaces (I gather it’s John von Neumann’s formulation), that is to say, the “Copenhagen interpretation.” (After doing all my studies—and, crucially, after the development of what to me is a satisfactory new approach—I now find that I no longer am as against the Copenhagen interpretation as some of the physicists seem to be.) … All in all, I do hope and think that seeing Diro’s and all won’t be necessary.

I also equally sincerely hope that my approach comes out unscathed during / after these discussions. … Though the discussions externally would be held in terms of mainstream QM, I would also be simultaneously running a second movie of my approach, in my mind alone, cross-checking whether it holds or not. (No, they wouldn’t even suspect that I was doing precisely that.)

I will be able to undertake editing of the Outline document (or leaving it as is and issuing a fresh document) only after these discussions.


6. The bottom-line:

The bottom-line is that my main conceptual development regarding QM is more or less over now, though further developments, discussions, simulations, paper-writing and all can always go on forever—there is never an end to it.


7. Data Science!

So, I now declare that I am free to turn my main focus to the other thing that interests me, viz., Data Science.

I already have a few projects in mind, and would like to initiate work on them right away. One of the “projects” I would like to undertake in the near future is: writing very brief notes, written mainly for myself, regarding the mathematical techniques used in data science. Another one is regarding applying ML techniques to NDT (nondestructive testing). Stay tuned.


A song I like:

(Western, instrumental) “Lara’s theme” (Doctor Zhivago)
Composer: Maurice Jarre

 

 

 

 

 

I need a [very well paying] job in data science. Now.

I need a very well paying job in data science. Now. In Pune, India.


 



Yes, I was visiting Kota for some official work when at the railway station of the [back then, a simple little] town, on a “whim” (borne out of a sense of curiosity, having heard the author’s name), I bought it. That was on 14th July 1987. The stamp of the A. H. Wheeler and Company (Rupa Publications), so well known to us all (including IITians and IIM graduates) back then, stand in a mute testimony for the same—the price, and the fact that this little book was imported by them. As to bearing testimony to the event, so does my signature, and the noting of the date. (I would ordinarily have no motivation to note a fake date, what do you say?) Also notable is the price of the book: Rs. 59/-. Bought out of Rs. 1800/- per month, if I remember those days right (and plain because I was an M. Tech. from (one of the then five) IITs. My juniors from my own UG college, COEP, would have had to start with a Rs. 1200/- or Rs. 1400/- package, and rise to my level in about 3 years, back then.)

Try to convince my the then back self that I would be jobless today.

No, really. Do that.

And see if I don’t call you names. Right here.

Americans!


A song I like:

(English, pop-song): “Another town, another train…”
Band (i.e. music, composition, lyrics, etc., to the best of my knowledge): ABBA

Bye for now.


And develop a habit to read—and understand—books. That’s important. As my example serves to illustrate the point. Whether I go jobful or jobless. It’s a good habit to cultivate.

But then, Americans have grown so insensitive to the authentic pains of others—including real works by others. The said attitude must reflect inwards too. The emphasis is on the word “authentic.” If a man doesn’t care for another honest, really very hard-working man in pain but spends his intellect and time in finding rationalizations to enhance his own prestige and money-obtaining powers, by the law of integrative mechanism of conscisousness that is the law of “karma,” the same thing must haunt him back—whether he be a Republican, or a Democrat. (Just a familiarity with the word “karma” is not enough to escape its bad—or good—effects. What matters are actions (“karma”s), ultimately. But given the fact that man has intellect, these are helped, not obscured, by it.)

Go, convince Americans to give me a good, well-paying job, in data science, and in Pune—the one that matches my one-sentence profile (mentioned here) and my temperament. As to the latter, simple it is, to put it in one sentence: “When the time calls for it, I am known to call a spade a spade.”

And, I can call Americans (and JPBTIs) exactly what they have earned.

But the more important paragraph was the second in this section. Starting from “But then, Americans have grown so insensitive to the authentic… .”

Instead of “pains,” you could even add a value / virtue. The statement would hold.