LOL!

LOL!

Yeah! Just that!

LOL!!



Update on 2020.02.17 16:02 IST:

The above is a snap I took yesterday at the Bhau Institute [^]’s event: “Pune Startup Fest” [^].

The reason I found myself laughing out loud was this: Yesterday, some of the distinguished panelists made one thing very clear: The valuation for the same product is greater in the S.F. Bay Area than in Pune, because the eco-system there is much more mature, with the investors there having seen many more exits—whether successful or otherwise.

Hmmm…

When I was in the USA (which was in the 1990s), they would always say that not every one has to rush there to the USA, especially to the S.F. Bay Area, because technology works the same way everywhere, and hence, people should rather be going back to India. The “they” of course included the Indians already established there.

In short, their never-stated argument was this much: You can make as much money by working from India as from the SF Bay Area. (Examples of the “big three” of Indian IT Industry would often be cited, esp. of Narayana Moorthy’s.) So, “why flock in here”?

Looks like, even if they took some 2–3 decades to do so, finally, something better seems to have downed on them. They seem to have gotten to the truth, which is: Market valuations for the same product are much greater in the SF Bay Area than elsewhere!

So, this all was in the background, in the context.

Then, I was musing about their rate of learning last night, and that’s when I wrote this post! Hence the title.

But of course, not every thing was laughable about, or in, the event.

I particularly liked Vatsal Kanakiya’s enthusiasm (the second guy from the right in the above photo, his LinkedIn profile is here [^]). I appreciated his ability to keep on highlighting what they (their firm) are doing, despite a somewhat cocky (if not outright dismissive) way in which his points were being seen, at least initially. Students attending the event might have found his enthusiasm more in line with theirs, especially after he not only mentioned Guy Kawasaki’s 10-20-30 rule [^], but also cited a statistics from their own office to support it: 1892 proposals last month (if I got that figure right). … Even if he was very young, it was this point which finally made it impossible, for many in that hall, to be too dismissive of him. (BTW, he is from Mumbai, not Pune. (Yes, COEP is in Pune.))

 


A song I like:

(Hindi) ये मेरे अंधेरे उजाले ना होते (“ye mere andhere ujaale naa hote”)
Music: Salil Chowdhury
Singers: Talat Mahmood, Lata Mangeshkar
Lyrics: Rajinder Kishen

[Buildings made from the granite stone [I studied geology in my SE i.e. second year of engineering] have a way of reminding you of a few songs. Drama! Contrast!! Life!!! Money!!!! Success!!!!! Competition Success Review!!!!!!  Governments!!!!!!! *Business*men!!!!!!!!]

 

 

I need a [very well paying] job in data science. Now.

I need a very well paying job in data science. Now. In Pune, India.


 



Yes, I was visiting Kota for some official work when at the railway station of the [back then, a simple little] town, on a “whim” (borne out of a sense of curiosity, having heard the author’s name), I bought it. That was on 14th July 1987. The stamp of the A. H. Wheeler and Company (Rupa Publications), so well known to us all (including IITians and IIM graduates) back then, stand in a mute testimony for the same—the price, and the fact that this little book was imported by them. As to bearing testimony to the event, so does my signature, and the noting of the date. (I would ordinarily have no motivation to note a fake date, what do you say?) Also notable is the price of the book: Rs. 59/-. Bought out of Rs. 1800/- per month, if I remember those days right (and plain because I was an M. Tech. from (one of the then five) IITs. My juniors from my own UG college, COEP, would have had to start with a Rs. 1200/- or Rs. 1400/- package, and rise to my level in about 3 years, back then.)

Try to convince my the then back self that I would be jobless today.

No, really. Do that.

And see if I don’t call you names. Right here.

Americans!


A song I like:

(English, pop-song): “Another town, another train…”
Band (i.e. music, composition, lyrics, etc., to the best of my knowledge): ABBA

Bye for now.


And develop a habit to read—and understand—books. That’s important. As my example serves to illustrate the point. Whether I go jobful or jobless. It’s a good habit to cultivate.

But then, Americans have grown so insensitive to the authentic pains of others—including real works by others. The said attitude must reflect inwards too. The emphasis is on the word “authentic.” If a man doesn’t care for another honest, really very hard-working man in pain but spends his intellect and time in finding rationalizations to enhance his own prestige and money-obtaining powers, by the law of integrative mechanism of conscisousness that is the law of “karma,” the same thing must haunt him back—whether he be a Republican, or a Democrat. (Just a familiarity with the word “karma” is not enough to escape its bad—or good—effects. What matters are actions (“karma”s), ultimately. But given the fact that man has intellect, these are helped, not obscured, by it.)

Go, convince Americans to give me a good, well-paying job, in data science, and in Pune—the one that matches my one-sentence profile (mentioned here) and my temperament. As to the latter, simple it is, to put it in one sentence: “When the time calls for it, I am known to call a spade a spade.”

And, I can call Americans (and JPBTIs) exactly what they have earned.

But the more important paragraph was the second in this section. Starting from “But then, Americans have grown so insensitive to the authentic… .”

Instead of “pains,” you could even add a value / virtue. The statement would hold.