And to think…

Many of you must have watched the news headlines on TV this week; many might have gathered it from the ‘net.

Mumbai—and much of Maharashtra—has gone down under. Under water.

And to think that all this water is now going to go purely to waste, completely unused.

… And that, starting some time right from say February next year, we are once again going to yell desperately about water shortage, about how water-tankers have already begun plying on the “roads” near the drought-hit villages. … May be we will get generous and send not just 4-wheeler tankers but also an entire train to a drought-hit city or two…

Depressing!


OK. Here’s something less depressing. [H/t Jennifer Ouellette (@JenLucPiquant) ]:

“More than 2,000 years ago, people were able to create ice in the desert even with temperatures above freezing!” [^]

The write-up mentions a TED video by Prof. Aaswath Raman. Watched it out of idle interest, checked out his Web site, and found another TED video by him, here [^]. Raman cites statistics that blew me!

They spend “only” $24 billion on supermarket refrigeration (and other food-related cooling), but they already spend $42 billion on data-center cooling!!


But, any way, I did some further “research” and landed at a few links, like the Wiki on Yakhchal [^], on wind-catcher [^], etc.  Prof. Raman’s explanation in terms of the radiative cooling was straight-forwards, but I am not sure I understand the mechanism behind the use of a qanat [^] in Yakhchal/windcatcher cooling. It would be cool to do some CFD simulations though.


Finally, since I am once again out of a job (and out of all my saved money and in fact also into credit-card loans due to some health issue cropping up once again), I was just idly wondering about all this renewable energy business, when something struck me.


The one big downside of windmills is that the electricity they generate fluctuates too much. You can’t rely on it; the availability is neither 24X7 nor uniform. Studies in fact also show that in accommodating the more or less “random” output of windmills into the conventional grid, the price of electricity actually goes up—even if the cost of generation alone at the windmill tower may be lower. Further, battery technology has not improved to such a point that you could store the randomly generated electricity economically.

So, I thought, why not use that randomly fluctuating windmill electricity in just producing the hydrogen gas?

No, I didn’t let out a Eureka. Instead, I let out a Google search. After all, the hydrogen gas could be used in fuel-cells, right? Would the cost of packaging and transportation of hydrogen gas be too much? … A little searching later, I landed at this link: [^]. Ummm… No, no, no…. Why shoot it into the natural gas grid? Why not compress it into cylinders and transport by trains? How does the cost economics work out in that case? Any idea?


Addendum on the same day, but after about a couple of hours:

Yes, I did run into this link: “Hydrogen: Hope or Hype?” [^] (with all the links therein, and then, also this: [^]).

But before running into those links, even as my googling on “hydrogen fuel energy density” still was in progress, I thought of this idea…

Why at all transport the hydrogen fuel from the windmill farm site to elsewhere? Why not simply install a fuel cell electricity generator right at the windmill farm? That is to say, why not use the hydrogen fuel generated via electrolysis as a flywheel of sorts? Get the idea? You introduce a couple of steps in between the windmill’s electricity and the conventional grid. But you also take out the fluctuations, the bad score on the 24X7 availability. And, you don’t have to worry about the transportation costs either.

What do you think?


Addendum on 12th July 2018, 13:27 hrs IST

Further, I also browsed a few links that explore another,  solution: using compressed air: a press report [^], and a technical paper [^]. (PDF of the paper is available, but the paper would be accessible only to mechanical engineers though. Later Update: As to the press report, well, the company it talks about has already merged with another company, and has abandoned the above-ground storage of compressed air [^])

I think that such a design reduces the number of steps of energy conversions. However, that does not necessarily mean that the solution involving hydrogen fuel generation and utilization (both right at the wind-farm) isn’t going to be economical.

Economics determines (or at least must determine) the choice. Enough on this topic for now. Wish I had a student working with me; I could have then written a paper after studying the solution I have proposed above. (The idea is worth a patent too. Too bad I don’t have the money to file one. Depressing, once again!!)


OK. Enough for the time being. I may later on add the songs section if I feel like it. And, iterative modifications will always be done, but will be mostly limited to small editorial changes. Bye for now.

 

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Some suggested time-pass (including ideas for Python scripts involving vectors and tensors)

Actually, I am busy writing down some notes on scalars, vectors and tensors, which I will share once they are complete. No, nothing great or very systematic; these are just a few notings here and there taken down mainly for myself. More like a formulae cheat-sheet, but the topic is complicated enough that it was necessary that I have them in one place. Once ready, I will share them. (They may get distributed as extra material on my upcoming FDP (faculty development program) on CFD, too.)

While I remain busy in this activity, and thus stay away from blogging, you can do a few things:


1.

Think about it: You can always build a unique tensor field from any given vector field, say by taking its gradient. (Or, you can build yet another unique tensor field, by taking the Kronecker product of the vector field variable with itself. Or, yet another one by taking the Kronecker product with some other vector field, even just the position field!). And, of course, as you know, you can always build a unique vector field from any scalar field, say by taking its gradient.

So, you can write a Python script to load a B&W image file (or load a color .PNG/.BMP/even .JPEG, and convert it into a gray-scale image). You can then interpret the gray-scale intensities of the individual pixels as the local scalar field values existing at the centers of cells of a structured (squares) mesh, and numerically compute the corresponding gradient vector and tensor fields.

Alternatively, you can also interpret the RGB (or HSL/HSV) values of a color image as the x-, y-, and z-components of a vector field, and then proceed to calculate the corresponding gradient tensor field.

Write the output in XML format.


2.

Think about it: You can always build a unique vector field from a given tensor field, say by taking its divergence. Similarly, you can always build a unique scalar field from a vector field, say by taking its divergence.

So, you can write a Python script to load a color image, and interpret the RGB (or HSL/HSV) values now as the xx-, xy-, and yy-components of a symmetrical 2D tensor, and go on to write the code to produce the corresponding vector and scalar fields.


Yes, as my resume shows, I was going to write a paper on a simple, interactive, pedagogical, software tool called “ToyDNS” (from Toy + Displacements, Strains, Stresses). I had written an extended abstract, and it had even got accepted in a renowned international conference. However, at that time, I was in an industrial job, and didn’t get the time to write the software or the paper. Even later on, the matter kept slipping.

I now plan to surely take this up on priority, as soon as I am done with (i) the notes currently in progress, and immediately thereafter, (ii) my upcoming stress-definition paper (see my last couple of posts here and the related discussion at iMechanica).

Anyway, the ideas in the points 1. and 2. above were, originally, a part of my planned “ToyDNS” paper.


3.

You can induce a “zen-like” state in you, or if not that, then at least a “TV-watching” state (actually, something better than that), simply by pursuing this URL [^], and pouring in all your valuable hours into it. … Or who knows, you might also turn into a closet meteorologist, just like me. [And don’t tell anyone, but what they show here is actually a vector field.]


4.

You can listen to this song in the next section…. It’s one of those flowy things which have come to us from that great old Grand-Master, viz., SD Burman himself! … Other songs falling in this same sub-sub-genre include, “yeh kisine geet chheDaa,” and “ThanDi hawaaein,” both of which I have run before. So, now, you go enjoy yet another one of the same kind—and quality. …


A Song I Like:

[It’s impossible to figure out whose contribution is greater here: SD’s, Sahir’s, or Lata’s. So, this is one of those happy circumstances in which the order of the listing of the credits is purely incidental … Also recommended is the video of this song. Mona Singh (aka Kalpana Kartik (i.e. Dev Anand’s wife, for the new generation)) is sooooo magical here, simply because she is so… natural here…]

(Hindi) “phailee huyi hai sapanon ki baahen”
Music: S. D. Burman
Lyrics: Sahir
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar


But don’t forget to write those Python scripts….

Take care, and bye for now…

 

How time flies…

I plan to conduct a smallish FDP (Faculty Development Program), for junior faculty, covering the basics of CFD sometime soon (may be starting in the second-half of February or early March or so).

During my course, I plan to give out some simple, pedagogical code that even non-programmers could easily run, and hopefully find easy to comprehend.


Don’t raise difficult questions right away!

Don’t ask me why I am doing it at all—especially given the fact that I myself never learnt my CFD in a class-room/university course settings. And especially given the fact that excellent course materials and codes already exist on the ‘net (e.g. Prof. Lorena Barba’s course, Prof. Atul Sharma’s book and Web site, to pick up just two of the so many resources already available).

But, yes, come to think of it, your question, by itself, is quite valid. It’s just that I am not going to entertain it.

Instead, I am going to ask you to recall that I am both a programmer and a professor.

As a programmer, you write code. You want to write code, and you do it. Whether better code already exists or not is not a consideration. You just write code.

As a professor, you teach. You want to teach, and you just do it. Whether better teachers or course-ware already exist or not is not a consideration. You just teach.

Admittedly, however, teaching is more difficult than coding. The difference here is that coding requires only a computer (plus software-writing software, of course!). But teaching requires other people! People who are willing to seat in front of you, at least faking listening to you with a rapt sort of an attention.

But just the way as a programmer you don’t worry whether you know the algorithm or not when you fire your favorite IDE, similarly, as a professor you don’t worry whether you will get students or not.

And then, one big advantage of being a senior professor is that you can always “c” your more junior colleagues, where “c” stands for {convince, confuse, cajole, coax, compel, …} to attend. That’s why, I am not worried—not at least for the time being—about whether I will get students for my course or not. Students will come, if you just begin teaching. That’s my working mantra for now…


But of course, right now, we are busy with our accreditation-related work. However, by February/March, I will become free—or at least free enough—to be able to begin conducting this FDP.


As my material for the course progressively gets ready, I will post some parts of it here. Eventually, by the time the FDP gets over, I would have uploaded all the material together at some place or the other. (May be I will create another blog just for that course material.)

This blog post was meant to note something on the coding side. But then, as usual, I ended up having this huge preface at the beginning.


When I was doing my PhD in the mid-naughties, I wanted a good public domain (preferably open source) mesh generator. There were several of them, but mostly on the Unix/Linux platform.

I had nothing basically against Unix/Linux as such. My problem was that I found it tough to remember the line commands. My working memory is relatively poor, very poor. And that’s a fact; I don’t say it out of any (false or true) modesty. So, I found it difficult to remember all those shell and system commands and their options. Especially painful for me was to climb up and down a directory hierarchy, just to locate a damn file and open it already! Given my poor working memory, I had to have the entire structure laid out in front of me, instead of remembering commands or file names from memory. Only then could I work fast enough to be effective enough a programmer. And so, I found it difficult to use Unix/Linux. Ergo, it had to be Windows.

But, most of this Computational Science/Engineering code was not available (or even compilable) on Windows, back then. Often, they were buggy. In the end, I ended up using Bjorn Niceno’s code, simply because it was in C (which I converted into C++), and because it was compilable on Windows.

Then, a few years later, when I was doing my industrial job in an FEM-software company, once again there was this requirement of an integrable mesh generator. It had to be: on Windows; open source; small enough, with not too many external dependencies (such as the Boost library or others); compilable using “the not really real” C++ compiler (viz. VC++ 6); one that was not very buggy or still was under active maintenance; and one more important point: the choice had to be respectable enough to be acceptable to the team and the management. I ended up using Jonathan Schewchuk’s Triangle.

Of course, all this along, I already knew about Gmsh, CGAL, and others (purely through my ‘net searches; none told me about any of them). But for some or the other reason, they were not “usable” by me.

Then, during the mid-teens (2010s), I went into teaching, and software development naturally took a back-seat.

A lot of things changed in the meanwhile. We all moved to 64-bit. I moved to Ubuntu for several years, and as the Idea NetSetter stopped working on the latest Ubuntu, I had no choice but to migrate back to Windows.

I then found that a lot of platform wars had already disappeared. Windows (and Microsoft in general) had become not only better but also more accommodating of the open source movement; the Linux movement had become mature enough to not look down upon the GUI users as mere script-kiddies; etc. In general, inter-operability had improved by leaps and bounds. Open Source projects were being not only released but also now being developed on Windows, not just on Unix/Linux. One possible reason why both the camps suddenly might have begun showing so much love to each other perhaps was that the mobile platform had come to replace the PC platform as the avant garde choice of software development. I don’t know, because I was away from the s/w world, but I am simply guessing that that could also be an important reason. In any case, code could now easily flow back and forth both the platforms.

Another thing to happen during my absence was: the wonderful development of the Python eco-system. It was always available on Ubuntu, and had made my life easier over there. After all, Python had a less whimsical syntax than many other alternatives (esp. the shell scripts); it carried all the marks of a real language. There were areas of discomfort. The one thing about Python which I found whimsical (and still do) is the lack of the braces for defining scopes. But such areas were relatively easy to overlook.

At least in the area of Computational Science and Engineering, Python had made it enormously easier to write ambitious codes. Just check out a C++ code for MPI for cluster computing, vs. the same code, written in Python. Or, think of not having to write ridiculously fast vector classes (or having to compile disparate C++ libraries using their own make systems and compiler options, and then to make them all work together). Or, think of using libraries like LAPACK. No more clumsy wrappers and having to keep on repeating multiple number of scope-resolution operators and namespaces bundling in ridiculously complex template classes. Just import NumPy or SciPy, and proceed to your work.

So, yes, I had come to register in my mind the great success story being forged by Python, in the meanwhile. (BTW, in case you don’t know, the name of the language comes from a British comedy TV serial, not from the whole-animal swallowing creep.) But as I said, I was now into academia, into core engineering, and there simply wasn’t much occasion to use any language, C++, Python or any other.

One more hindrance went away when I “discovered” that the PyCharm IDE existed! It not only was free, but also had VC++ key-bindings already bundled in. W o n d e r f u l ! (I would have no working memory to relearn yet another set of key-bindings, you see!)

In the meanwhile, VC++ anyway had become very big, very slow and lethargic, taking forever for the intelli-sense ever to get to produce something, anything. The older, lightweight, lightening-fast, and overall so charming IDE i.e. the VC++ 6, had given way, because of the .NET platform, to this new IDE which behaved as if it was designed to kill the C++ language. My forays into using Eclipse CDT (with VC++ key-bindings) were only partially successful. Eclipse was no longer buggy; it had begun working really well. The major trouble here was: there was no integrated help at the press of the “F1” key. Remember my poor working memory? I had to have that F1 key opening up the .chm helpf file at just the right place. But that was not happening. And, debug-stepping through the code still was not as seamless as I had gotten used to, in the VC++ 6.

But with PyCharm + Visual Studio key bindings, most my concerns got evaporated. Being an interpreted language, Python always would have an advantage as far as debug-stepping through the code is concerned. That’s the straight-forward part. But the real game-changer for me was: the maturation of the entire Python eco-system.

Every library you could possibly wish for was there, already available, like Aladdin’s genie standing with folded hands.

OK. Let me give you an example. You think of doing some good visualization. You have MatPlotLib. And a very helpful help file, complete with neat examples. No, you want more impressive graphics, like, say, volume rendering (voxel visualization). You have the entire VTK wrappped in; what more could you possibly want? (Windows vs. Linux didn’t matter.) But you instead want to write some custom-code, say for animation? You have not just one, not just two, but literally tens of libraries covering everything: from OpenGL, to scene-graphs, to computational geometry, to physics engines, to animation, to games-writing, and what not. Windowing? You had the MFC-style WxWidgets, already put into a Python avatar as WxPython. (OK, OpenGL still gives trouble with WxPython for anything ambitious. But such things are rather isolated instances when it comes to the overall Python eco-system.)

And, closer to my immediate concerns, I was delighted to find that, by now, both OpenFOAM and Gmsh had become neatly available on Windows. That is, not just “available,” i.e., not just as sources that can be read, but also working as if the libraries were some shrink-wrapped software!

Availability on Windows was important to me, because, at least in India, it’s the only platform of familiarity (and hence of choice) for almost all of the faculty members from any of the e-school departments other than CS/IT.

Hints: For OpenFOAM, check out blueCFD instead of running it through Dockers. It’s clean, and indeed works as advertised. As to Gmsh, ditto. And, it also comes with Python wrappers.

While the availability of OpenFOAM on Windows was only too welcome, the fact is, its code is guaranteed to be completely inaccessible to a typical junior faculty member from, say, a mechanical or a civil or a chemical engineering department. First, OpenFOAM is written in real (“templated”) C++. Second, it is very bulky (millions of lines of code, may be?). Clearly beyond the comprehension of a guy who has never seen more than 50 lines of C code at a time in his life before. Third, it requires the GNU compiler, special make environment, and a host of dependencies. You simply cannot open OpenFOAM and show how those FVM algorithms from Patankar’s/Versteeg & Malasekara’s book do the work, under its hood. Neither can you ask your students to change a line here or there, may be add a line to produce an additional file output, just for bringing out the actual working of an FVM algorithm.

In short, OpenFOAM is out.

So, I have decided to use OpenFOAM only as a “backup.” My primary teaching material will only be Python snippets. The students will also get to learn how to install OpenFOAM and run the simplest tutorials. But the actual illustrations of the CFD ideas will be done using Python. I plan to cover only FVM and only simpler aspects of that. For instance, I plan to use only structured rectangular grids, not non-orthogonal ones.

I will write code that (i) generates mesh, (ii) reads mesh generated by the blockMesh of OpenFOAM, (iii) implements one or two simple BCs, (iv) implements the SIMPLE algorithm, and (v) uses MatPlotLib or ParaView to visualize the output (including any intermediate outputs of the algorithms).

I may then compare the outputs of these Python snippets with a similar output produced by OpenFOAM, for one or two simplest cases like a simple laminar flow over step. (I don’t think I will be covering VOF or any other multi-phase technique. My course is meant to be covering only the basics.)

But not having checked Gmsh recently, and thus still carrying my old impressions, I was almost sure I would have to write something quick in Python to convert BMP files (showing geometry) into mesh files (with each pixel turning into a finite volume cell). The trouble with this approach was, the ability to impose boundary conditions would be seriously limited. So, I was a bit worried about it.

But then, last week, I just happened to check Gmsh, just to be sure, you know! And, WOW! I now “discovered” that the Gmsh is already all Python-ed in. Great! I just tried it, and found that it works, as bundled. Even on Windows. (Yes, even on Win7 (64-bit), SP1).

I was delighted, excited, even thrilled.

And then, I began “reflecting.” (Remember I am a professor?)

I remembered the times when I used to sit in a cyber-cafe, painfully downloading source code libraries over a single 64 kbps connection which would shared in that cyber-cafe over 6–8 PCs, without any UPS or backups in case the power went out. I would download the sources that way at the cyber-cafe, take them home to a Pentium machine running Win2K, try to open and read the source only to find that I had forgot to do the CLRF conversion first! And then, the sources wouldn’t compile because the make environment wouldn’t be available on Windows. Or something or the other of that sort. But still, I fought on. I remember having downloaded not only the OpenFOAM sources (with the hope of finding some way to compile them on Windows), but also MPICH2, PetSc 2.x, CGAL (some early version), and what not. Ultimately, after my valiant tries at the machine for a week or two, “nothing is going to work here” I would eventually admit to myself.

And here is the contrast. I have a 4G connection so I can comfortably seat at home, and use the Python pip (or the PyCharm’s Project Interpreter) to download or automatically update all the required libraries, even the heavy-weights like what they bundle inside SciPy and NumPy, or the VTK. I no longer have to manually ensure version incompatibilities, platform incompatibilities. I know I could develop on Ubuntu if I want to, and the student would be able to run the same thing on Windows.

Gone are those days. And how swiftly, it seems now.

How time flies…


I will be able to come back only next month because our accreditation-related documentation work has now gone into its final, culminating phase, which occupies the rest of this month. So, excuse me until sometime in February, say until 11th or so. I will sure try to post a snippet or two on using Gmsh in the meanwhile, but it doesn’t really look at all feasible. So, there.

Bye for now, and take care…


A Song I Like:

[Tomorrow is (Sanskrit, Marathi) “Ganesh Jayanti,” the birth-day of Lord Ganesha, which also happens to be the auspicious (Sanskrit, Marathi) “tithee” (i.e. lunar day) on which my mother passed away, five years ago. In her fond remembrance, I here run one of those songs which both of us liked. … Music is strange. I mean, a song as mature as this one, but I remember, I still had come to like it even as a school-boy. May be it was her absent-minded humming of this song which had helped? … may be. … Anyway, here’s the song.]

(Hindi) “chhup gayaa koi re, door se pukaarake”
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Music: Hemant Kumar
Lyrics: Rajinder Kishan

 

A prediction. Also, a couple of wishes…

The Prediction:

While the week of the Nobel prizes always has a way to generate a sense of suspense, of excitement, and even of wonderment, as far as I am concerned, the one prize that does that in the real sense to me is, of course, the Physics Nobel. … Nothing compares to it. Chemistry can come close, but not always. [And, Mr. Nobel was a good guy; he instituted no prize for maths! [LOL!]]. …

The Physics Nobel is the King of all awards in all fields, as far as I am concerned.

That’s why, this year, I have this feeling of missing something. … The reason is, this year’s Physics Nobel is already “known”; it will go to Kip Thorne and pals.

[I will not eat crow even if they don’t get it. [… Unless, of course, you know a delicious recipe or two for the same, and also demonstrate it to me, complete with you sampling it first.]]

But yes, Kip Thorne richly deserves it, and he will get it. That’s the prediction. I wanted to slip it in even if only few hours before the announcement arrives.

I will update this post later right today/tonight, after the Physics Nobel is actually announced.


Now let me come to the couple of wishes, as mentioned in the title. I will try to be brief. [Have been too busy these days… OK. Will let you know. We are going in for accreditation, and so, it’s been all heavy documentation-related work for the past few months. Despite all that hard-work, we still have managed to slip a bit on the progress, and so, currently, we are working on all week-ends and on most public holidays, too. [Yes, we came to work yesterday.] So, it’s only somehow that I manage to find some time to slip in this post—which is written absolutely on the fly, with no second thoughts or re-reading before posting. … So excuse me if there is a bit of lack of balance in the presentation, and of course, typos etc.]


Wish # 1:

The first wish is that a Physics Nobel should go, in a combined way, to what actually are two separate, but very intimately related, and two most significant advances in the physical understanding of man: (i) chaos theory (including fractals) and (ii)catastrophe theory.

If you don’t like the idea of two ideas being given a single Nobel, then, well, let me put it this way: the Nobel should be given for achieving the most significant advancements in the field of the differential nonlinearities, for a very substantial progress in the physical understanding of the behaviour of nonlinear physical systems, forging pathways for predictive capacity.

Let me emphasize, this has been one of the most significant advances in physics in the last century. No, saying so is emphatically not a hyperbole.

And, yes, it’s an advance in physics, primarily, and then, also in maths—but only secondarily.

… It’s unfortunate that an advancement which has been this remarkable never did register as such with most of the S&T “manpower”, esp., engineers and practical designers. It’s also unfortunate that the twin advancement arrived on the scene at the time of bad cultural (even epistemological) trends, and so, the advancements got embedded in a fabric of hyperbole, even nonsense.

But regardless of the cultural tones in which the popular presentations of these advancements (esp. of the chaos theory) got couched, taken as a science, the studies of nonlinearity in the physical systems has been a very, very, original, and a very, very creative, advancement. It needs to be recognized as such.

That way, I don’t much care for what it helped produce on the maths side of it. But yes, even a not very extraordinarily talented undergraduate in CS (one with a special interest in deterministic methods in cryptography) would be able to tell you how much light got shone on their discipline because of the catastrophe and chaos theories.

The catastrophe theory has been simply marvellous in one crucial aspect: it actually pushed the boundaries of what is understood by the term: mathematics. The theory has been daring enough to propose, literally for the first time in the entire history of mankind, a well-refined qualitative approach to an infinity of quantitative processes taken as a group.

The distinction between the qualitative and the quantitative had kept philosophers (and laymen) pre-occupied for millenia. But the nonlinear theory has been the first theoretical approach that tells you how to spot and isolate the objective bases for distinguishing what we consider as the qualitative changes.

Remove the understanding given by the nonlinear theory—by the catastrophe-theoretical approach—and, once in the domain of the linear theory, the differences in kind immediately begin to appear as more or less completely arbitrary. There is no place in theory for them—the qualitative distinctions are external to the theory because a linear system always behaves exactly the same with any quantitative changes made, at any scale, to any of the controlling parameters. Since in the linear theory the qualitative changes are not produced from within the theory itself, such distinctions must be imported into it out of some considerations that are in principle external to the theory.

People often confuse such imports with “applications.” No, when it comes to the linear theory, it’s not the considerations of applications which can be said to be driving any divisions of qualitative changes. The qualitative distinctions are basically arbitrary in a linear theory. It is important to realize that that usual question: “Now where do we draw the line?” is basically absolutely superfluous once you are within the domain of the linear systems. There are no objective grounds on the basis of which such distinctions can be made.

Studies of the nonlinear phenomena sure do precede the catastrophe and the chaos theories. Even in the times before these two theories came on the scene, applied physicists would think of certain ideas such as differences of regimes, esp. in the areas like fluid dynamics.

But to understand the illuminating power of the nonlinear theory, just catch hold of an industrial CFD guy (or a good professor of fluid dynamics from a good university [not, you know, from SPPU or similar universities]), and ask him whether there can be any deeper theoretical significance to the procedure of the Buckingham Pi Theorem, to the necessity, in his art (or science) of having to use so many dimensionless numbers. (Every mechanical/allied engineering undergraduate has at least once in life cursed the sheer number of them.) The competent CFD guy (or the good professor) would easily be at a loss. Then, toss a good book on the Catastrophe Theory to him, leave him alone for a couple of weeks or may be a month, return, and raise the same question again. He now may or may not have a very good, “flowy” sort of a verbal answer ready for you. But one look at his face would tell you that it has now begun to reflect a qualitatively different depth of physical understanding even as he tries to tackle that question in his own way. That difference arises only because of the Catastrophe Theory.

As to the Chaos Theory (and I club the fractal theory right in it), more number of people are likely to know about it, and so, I don’t have to wax a lot (whether eloquently or incompetently). But let me tell you one thing.

Feigenbaum’s discovery of the universal constant remains, to my mind, one of the most ingenious advancements in the entire history of physics, even of science. Especially, given the experimental equipment with which he made that discovery—a handheld HP Calculator (not a computer) in the seventies (or may be in the sixties)! … And yes, getting to that universal constant was, if you ask me, an act of discovery, and not of invention. (Invention was very intimately involved in the process; but the overall act and the end-product was one of discovery.)

So, here is a wish that these fundamental studies of the nonlinear systems get their due—the recognition they so well deserve—in the form of a Physics Nobel.

…And, as always, the sooner the better!


Wish # 2:

The second wish I want to put up here is this: I wish there was some commercial/applied artist, well-conversant with the “art” of supplying illustrations for a physics book, who also was available for a long-term project I have in mind.

To share a bit: Years ago (actually, almost two decades ago, in 1998 to be precise), I had made a suggestion that novels by Ayn Rand be put in the form of comics. As far as I was concerned, the idea was novel (i.e. new). I didn’t know at that time that a comics-book version of The Fountainhead had already been conceived of by none other than Ayn Rand herself, and it, in fact, had also been executed. In short, there was a comics-book version of The Fountainhead. … These days, I gather, they are doing something similar for Atlas Shrugged.

If you think about it, my idea was not at all a leap of imagination. Newspapers (even those in India) have been carrying comic strips for decades (right since before my own childhood), and Amar Chitrakatha was coming of age just when I was. (It was founded in 1967 by Mr. Pai.)

Similarly, conceiving of a comics-like book for physics is not at all a very creative act of imagination. In fact, it is not even original. Everyone knows those books by that Japanese linguistics group, the books on topics like the Fourier theory.

So, no claim of originality here.

It’s just that for my new theory of QM, I find that the format of a comics-book would be most suitable. (And what the hell if physicists don’t take me seriously because I put it in this form first. Who cares what they think anyway!)

Indeed, I would even like to write/produce some comics books on maths topics, too. Topics like grads, divs, curls, tensors, etc., eventually. … Guess I will save that part for keeping me preoccupied during my retirement. BTW, my retirement is not all that far away; it’s going to be here pretty soon, right within just five years from now. (Do one thing: Check out what I was writing, say in 2012 on this blog.)

But the one thing I would like write/produce right in the more immediate future is: the comics book on QM, putting forth my new approach.

So, in the closing, here is a request. If you know some artist (or an engineer/physicist with fairly good sketching/computer-drawing skills), and has time at hand, and has the capacity to stay put in a sizeable project, and won’t ask money for it (a fair share in the royalty is a given—provided we manage to find a publisher first, that is), then please do bring this post to his notice.

 


A Song I Like:

And, finally, here is the Marathi song I had promised you the last time round. It’s a fusion of what to my mind is one of the best tunes Shrinivas Khale ever produced, and the best justice to the words and the tunes by the singer. Imagine any one else in her place, and you will immediately come to know what I mean. … Pushpa Pagdhare easily takes this song to the levels of the very best by the best, including Lata Mangeshkar. [Oh yes, BTW, congrats are due to the selection committe of this year’s Lata Mangeshkar award, for selecting Pushpa Pagdhare.]

(Marathi) “yeuni swapnaat maajhyaa…”
Singer: Pushpa Pagdhare
Music: Shrinivas Khale
Lyrics: Devakinandan Saraswat

[PS: Note: I am going to come back and add an update once this year’s Physics Nobel is announced. At that time (or tonight) I will also try to streamline this post.

Then, I will be gone off the blogging for yet another couple of weeks or so—unless it’s a small little “kutty” post of the “Blog-Filler” kind or two.]