A recruiter calls me to talk about a Data Science position in Pune…

A recruiter calls me this morning, from Hyderabad, all unexpectedly. No emails beforehand, no recruiter messages at a jobs-site, no SMSs, nothing. Just a direct call. They are considering me for a Data Science position, in Pune. She says it’s a position about Data Science and Python.

Asks about my total and relevant experience. I tell: 23 years in all, ~12 years in s/w development. She asks about my Python experience. I tell: Familiarity for, may be, 10 years if not more; actual use for, may be, 5–6 years. (Turns out to be since 2006, and since at least 2013–14 times, in connection with scripting while using the open-source FEM libraries, respectively.)

She then asks me about my data science experience.

I tell that I’ve been into it for about a year by now, but no professional, paid experience as such. Also add that I do understand kernels from the Kaggle competitions. (In fact, I can think of bringing about meaningful variations in them too.)

She asks about my last job. I tell: Academia, recently, after PhD. (She sounds a bit concerned, may be confused. She must be looking at my resume.) But before that, I was in the software field, I say. And now, am now looking for a Data Science position. I then add: In the software development field, my last job was as a Systems Architect, reporting directly to the CEO. … By this time, she must have spotted this software experience listing in my resume. She says “OK,” with just a shade of a sense of satisfaction audible in the way she sounds.

She then again asks me about my Data Science experience. I now tell her directly: Paid experience, 0 (zero) years.

Hearing it, she keeps the phone down. Just like that. Without any concluding remarks. Not even just a veneer of a courtesey like a hurried “OK, if you are found suitable, we will get back to you” etc. Nothing. Not even that. No thanks, nothing.

She. Just. Keeps. The. Phone. Down.


It must be a project for one of those companies from America, especially from California, especially from the San Francisco Bay Area. Only they can be as dumbidiots* as that. And, they could very well be one of those “Capitalist”s, esp. Indians—there and here. “You are just as good as your performance on your last job!” Said sternly. And, the quote taken literally. In the current context, it is obviously taken to mean that I am as good as zero, when it comes to Data Science positions.

Dumbidiots*. Zeno’s descendents. They don’t deserve to hire me.

But these stupididiots* do amass a lot of money for themselves. Help build the nation. Etc.

Rich idiocy.


*By the rules of the Sanskrit grammar, this “sandhi” is correct. English is an Indo-European language. So, such a “sandhi” should be allowed. The jointed word means something like “k’mt’om” [^] “moorkha”. (You look up “moorkha”.)


A song I like:
(Hindi) “hum the, woh thee, aur, samaa rangeen…”
Singer: Kishore Kumar
Lyrics: Majrooh Sultanpuri
Music: S. D. Burman

 

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TL;DR: Why am I jobless?

TL;DR: Why am I jobless?

Because, they had no guts (or even sense) to give me a job in time, and thereby allow even me to become a rich man—even if they had always had the wealth to do so. Only if they were honest enough!


Simple enough a formulation, no?

But does it carry even a ring of a truth? The responsibility of finding an answer to this question rests with those who raise it.


A song I like:

(Hindi) “dil mein kisi ke pyaar kaa…”
Music: Ravi [Sharma]
Lyrics: Saahir Ludhiyaanvi
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar

[Lata is good here but I like her much better in the original song (i.e. another song of the same tune, by the same composer): “woh dil kahaan se laaoon…” If I were to rate that song, I would put her at the top, followed by Ravi and then by Rajinder Kishen (the lyricist for the original one). Rajinder Kishen’s lyrics for the original song were very good too, and he is a great lyricist—he has penned some really memorable songs in his career. But somehow, I like the theme and the tone of the present lyrics by Saahir better. “dil mein kisi ke pyaar kaa jalataa huaa diyaa, duniyaa ki aandhiyon se bhalaa yeh boojhegaa kyaa?” … Sublime!

Kishore Kumar, in comparison to all the four, comes across as a much lesser guy in his version of the present song. Having appreciated and admired him very deeply over so many years, it was not exactly a simple statement to make, but that’s the way things are here.]

 

 

 

I need a [very well paying] job in data science. Now.

I need a very well paying job in data science. Now. In Pune, India.


 



Yes, I was visiting Kota for some official work when at the railway station of the [back then, a simple little] town, on a “whim” (borne out of a sense of curiosity, having heard the author’s name), I bought it. That was on 14th July 1987. The stamp of the A. H. Wheeler and Company (Rupa Publications), so well known to us all (including IITians and IIM graduates) back then, stand in a mute testimony for the same—the price, and the fact that this little book was imported by them. As to bearing testimony to the event, so does my signature, and the noting of the date. (I would ordinarily have no motivation to note a fake date, what do you say?) Also notable is the price of the book: Rs. 59/-. Bought out of Rs. 1800/- per month, if I remember those days right (and plain because I was an M. Tech. from (one of the then five) IITs. My juniors from my own UG college, COEP, would have had to start with a Rs. 1200/- or Rs. 1400/- package, and rise to my level in about 3 years, back then.)

Try to convince my the then back self that I would be jobless today.

No, really. Do that.

And see if I don’t call you names. Right here.

Americans!


A song I like:

(English, pop-song): “Another town, another train…”
Band (i.e. music, composition, lyrics, etc., to the best of my knowledge): ABBA

Bye for now.


And develop a habit to read—and understand—books. That’s important. As my example serves to illustrate the point. Whether I go jobful or jobless. It’s a good habit to cultivate.

But then, Americans have grown so insensitive to the authentic pains of others—including real works by others. The said attitude must reflect inwards too. The emphasis is on the word “authentic.” If a man doesn’t care for another honest, really very hard-working man in pain but spends his intellect and time in finding rationalizations to enhance his own prestige and money-obtaining powers, by the law of integrative mechanism of conscisousness that is the law of “karma,” the same thing must haunt him back—whether he be a Republican, or a Democrat. (Just a familiarity with the word “karma” is not enough to escape its bad—or good—effects. What matters are actions (“karma”s), ultimately. But given the fact that man has intellect, these are helped, not obscured, by it.)

Go, convince Americans to give me a good, well-paying job, in data science, and in Pune—the one that matches my one-sentence profile (mentioned here) and my temperament. As to the latter, simple it is, to put it in one sentence: “When the time calls for it, I am known to call a spade a spade.”

And, I can call Americans (and JPBTIs) exactly what they have earned.

But the more important paragraph was the second in this section. Starting from “But then, Americans have grown so insensitive to the authentic… .”

Instead of “pains,” you could even add a value / virtue. The statement would hold.

 

 

The smith.edu would not be sponsoring my further research on QM in any form… Yaaawn…

The smith.edu would not be sponsoring my further research on QM in any form. … Yaaawn…

Just saying it. Not that they ever did.

But that’s what I gather anyway. That they will neither be sponsoring nor be supporting my research. Nor take its findings in the true spirit of science.

I am neither happy nor unhappy about it. Just plain [yawningly] curious. … To be dealt with, some other time—these kind of American-borns. All these intellectual goons who take pleasure in tearing down my well-constructed thoughts, in evading the several virtues of my research.

Sometimes they do make me laugh.

But apart from being authentic intellectual goons, they—these Americans—also are very, very powerful. Laughing at them is not, really speaking, the right response. I mean it can be. But the response should not consist of laughing them away. They are very, very powerful. And, rich. And, goons.


In the meanwhile, check out two neat resources on QM, both free and seemingly written with unusually high degree of personal involvement with the writing project:

  1. https://arxiv.org/abs/1007.4184
  2. https://arxiv.org/abs/1703.10620

Sure enough, I’ve mentioned them both here before. But they need to be highlighted again. Especially, the second one. I will be assuming that you have gone through this paper when I return the next time. We will be dealing with this question that some (white, scholarly) goons (obviously) have no inkling of:

If the system wavefunction \Psi is defined over a 3N-dimensional abstract, mathematical configuration space in the mainstream QM, can a new theory have its wavefunction \Psi defined over the physical 3-dimensional space? If yes, how?


You know, there are those other Americans who find it shameful to ever reply to me. They think it is beneath them. Naturally, they are not grateful to me even if the errors of their own (analog vs. digital) or of their group (third law of thermodynamics) have been gently pointed out. Americans, after all. Prestigious Americans. Even their graves are going to be just that—impressive and prestigious.

Anyway, let’s leave their dirty souls with them, and focus on the third law of thermodynamics. Choose the correct answer: The third law of thermodynamics says that the absolute zero temperature:

(a) cannot exist in the universe.

(b) cannot be reached in any process.

If you know the correct answer and point it out to the prestigious Americans who have made a mistake about it, they don’t like it—no matter how indirectly and gently you do it.

How can you expect them to extend support to your QM research, let alone sponsor it? be it MA or CA?

Anyway, let me wind up…


A song I like:

(Hindi) “maanzee naiyaa DhoonDe kinaaraa”
Singer: Mukesh
Music: Laxmikant-Pyaarelaal
Lyrics: Anand Bakshi

[Again a song from my childhood days, a song for the soul.]


But tell me, really, aren’t all those Americans—white or black or brown or others, whether intellectuals or not… Aren’t they just plain goons? … Hasn’t that thought passed by you before? I mean, whether they are socially respectable or otherwise…

But why are they such goons?


 

 


 


 


 

 

 

Flames not so old…

The same picture, but two American interpretations, both partly misleading (to varying degrees):

NASA releases a photo [^] on the FaceBook, on 24 August at 14:24, with this note:

The visualization above highlights NASA Earth satellite data showing aerosols on August 23, 2018. On that day, huge plumes of smoke drifted over North America and Africa, three different tropical cyclones churned in the Pacific Ocean, and large clouds of dust blew over deserts in Africa and Asia. The storms are visible within giant swirls of sea salt aerosol (blue), which winds loft into the air as part of sea spray. Black carbon particles (red) are among the particles emitted by fires; vehicle and factory emissions are another common source. Particles the model classified as dust are shown in purple. The visualization includes a layer of night light data collected by the day-night band of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on Suomi NPP that shows the locations of towns and cities.

[Emphasis in bold added by me.]

For your convenience, I reproduce the picture here:

Aerosol data by NASA

Aerosol data by NASA. Red means: Carbon emissions. Blue means: Sea Salt. Purple means: Dust particles.

Nicole Sharp blogs [^] about it at her blog FYFD, on Aug 29, 2018 10:00 am, with this description:

Aerosols, micron-sized particles suspended in the atmosphere, impact our weather and air quality. This visualization shows several varieties of aerosol as measured August 23rd, 2018 by satellite. The blue streaks are sea salt suspended in the air; the brightest highlights show three tropical cyclones in the Pacific. Purple marks dust. Strong winds across the Sahara Desert send large plumes of dust wafting eastward. Finally, the red areas show black carbon emissions. Raging wildfires across western North America are releasing large amounts of carbon, but vehicle and factory emissions are also significant sources. (Image credit: NASA; via Katherine G.)

[Again, emphasis in bold is mine.]

As of today, Sharp’s post has collected some 281 notes, and almost all of them have “liked” it.

I liked it too—except for the last half of the last sentence, viz., the idea that vehicle and factory emissions are significant sources (cf. NASA’s characterization):


My comment:

NASA commits an error of omission. Dr. Sharp compounds it with an error of commission. Let’s see how.

NASA does find it important to mention that the man-made sources of carbon are “common.” However, the statement is ambiguous, perhaps deliberately so. It curiously omits to mention that the quantity of such “common” sources is so small that there is no choice but to regard it as “not critical.” We may not be in a position to call the “common” part an error of commission. But not explaining that the man-made sources play negligible (even vanishingly small) role in Global Warming, is sure an error of omission on NASA’s part.

Dr. Sharp compounds it with an error of commission. She calls man-made sources “significant.”

If I were to have an SE/TE student, I would assign a simple Python script to do a histogram and/or compute the densities of red pixels and have them juxtaposed with areas of high urban population/factory density.


This post may change in future:

BTW, I am only too well aware of the ugly political wars being waged by a lot of people in this area (of Global Warming). Since I do appreciate Dr. Sharp’s blog, I would be willing to delete all references to her writing from this post.

However, I am going to keep NASA’s description and the photo intact. It serves as a good example of how a good visualization can help in properly apprehending big data.

In case I delete references to Sharp’s blog, I will simply add another passage on my own, bringing out how man-made emissions are not the real cause for concern.

But in any case, I would refuse to be drawn into those ugly political wars surrounding the issue of Global Warming. I have neither the interest nor the bandwidth to get into it, and further, I find (though can’t off-hand quote) that several good modelers/scientists have come to offer very good, detailed, and comprehensive perspectives that justify my position (mentioned in the preceding paragraph). [Off-hand, I very vaguely remember an academic, a lady, perhaps from the state of Georgia in the US?]


The value of pictures:

One final point.

But, regardless of it all (related to Global Warming and its politics), this picture does serve to highlight a very important point: the undeniable strength of a good visualization.

Yes I do find that, in a proper context, a picture is worth a thousand words. The obvious validity of this conclusion is not affected by Aristotle’s erroneous epistemology, in particular, his wrong assertion that man thinks in terms of “images.” No, he does not.

So, sure, a picture is not an argument, as Peikoff argued in the late 90s (without using pictures, I believe). If Peikoff’s statement is taken in its context, you would agree with it, too.

But for a great variety of useful contexts, as the one above, I do think that a picture is worth a thousand words. Without such being the case, a post like this wouldn’t have been possible.


A Song I Like:
(Hindi) “dil sajan jalataa hai…”
Singer: Asha Bhosale
Music: R. D. Burman [actually, Bertha Egnos [^]]
Lyrics: Anand Bakshi


Copying it right:

“itwofs” very helpfully informs us [^] that this song was:

Inspired in the true sense, by the track, ‘Korbosha (Down by the river) from the South African stage musical, Ipi Ntombi (1974).”

However, unfortunately, he does not give the name of the original composer. It is: Bertha Egnos (apparently, a white woman from South Africa [^]).

“itwofs” further opines that:

Its the mere few initial bars that seem to have sparked Pancham create the totally awesome track [snip]. The actual tunes are completely different and as original as Pancham can get.

I disagree.

Listen to Korbosha and to this song, once again. You will sure find that it is far more than “mere few initial bars.” On the contrary, except for a minor twist here or there (and that too only in some parts of the “antaraa”/stanza), Burman’s song is almost completely lifted from Egnos’s, as far as the tune goes. And the tune is one of the most basic—and crucial—elements of a song, perhaps the most crucial one.

However, what Burman does here is to “customize” this song to “suit the Indian road conditions tastes.” This task also can be demanding; doing it right takes a very skillful and sensitive composer, and R. D. certainly shows his talents in this regard, too, here. Further, Asha not only makes it “totally, like, totally” Indian, she also adds a personal chutzpah. The combination of Egnos, RD and Asha is awesome.

If the Indian reader’s “pride” got hurt: For a reverse situation of “phoreenn” people customizing our songs, go see how well Paul Mauriat does it.

One final word: The video here is not recommended. It looks (and is!) too gaudy. So, even if you download a YouTube video, I recommend that you search for good Open Source tools and use it to extract just the audio track from this video. … If you are not well conversant with the music software, then Audacity would confuse you. However, as far as just converting MP4 to MP3 is concerned, VLC works just as great; use the menu: Media \ Convert/Save. This menu command works independently of the song playing in the “main” VLC window.


Bye for now… Some editing could be done later on.