Data Science links—1

Oakay… My bookmarks library has grown too big. Time to move at least a few of them to a blog-post. Here they are. … The last one is not on Data Science, but it happens to be the most important one of them all!



On Bayes’ theorem:

Oscar Bonilla. “Visualizing Bayes’ theorem” [^].

Jayesh Thukarul. “Bayes’ Theorem explained” [^].

Victor Powell. “Conditional probability” [^].


Explanations with visualizations:

Victor Powell. “Explained Visually.” [^]

Christopher Olah. Many topics [^]. For instance, see “Calculus on computational graphs: backpropagation” [^].


Fooling the neural network:

Julia Evans. “How to trick a neural network into thinking a panda is a vulture” [^].

Andrej Karpathy. “Breaking linear classifiers on ImageNet” [^].

A. Nguyen, J. Yosinski, and J. Clune. “Deep neural networks are easily fooled: High confidence predictions for unrecognizable images” [^]

Melanie Mitchell. “Artificial Intelligence hits the barrier of meaning” [^]


The Most Important link!

Ijad Madisch. “Why I hire scientists, and why you should, too” [^]


A song I like:

(Western, pop) “Billie Jean”
Artist: Michael Jackson

[Back in the ’80s, this song used to get played in the restaurants from the Pune camp area, and also in the cinema halls like West-End, Rahul, Alka, etc. The camp area was so beautiful, back then—also uncrowded, and quiet.

This song would also come floating on the air, while sitting in the evening at the Quark cafe, situated in the middle of all the IITM hostels (next to skating rink). Some or the other guy would be playing it in a nearby hostel room on one of those stereo systems which would come with those 1 or 2 feet tall “hi-fi” speaker-boxes. Each box typically had three stacked speakers. A combination of a separately sitting sub-woofer with a few small other boxes or a soundbar, so ubiquitous today, had not been invented yet… Back then, Quark was a completely open-air cafe—a small patch of ground surrounded by small trees, and a tiny hexagonal hut, built in RCC, for serving snacks. There were no benches, even, at Quark. People would sit on those small concrete blocks (brought from the civil department where they would come for testing). Deer would be roaming very nearby around. A daring one or two could venture to come forward and eat pizza out of your (fully) extended hand!…

…Anyway, coming back to the song itself, I had completely forgotten it, but got reminded when @curiouswavefn mentioned it in one of his tweets recently. … When I read the tweet, I couldn’t make out that it was this song (apart from Bach’s variations) that he was referring to. I just idly checked out both of them, and then, while listening to it, I suddenly recognized this song. … You see, unlike so many other guys of e-schools of our times, I wouldn’t listen to a lot of Western pop-songs those days (and still don’t). Beatles, ABBA and a few other groups/singers, may be, also the Western instrumentals (a lot) and the Western classical music (some, but definitely). But somehow, I was never too much into the Western pop songs. … Another thing. The way these Western singers sing, it used to be very, very hard for me to figure out the lyrics back then—and the situation continues mostly the same way even today! So, recognizing a song by its name was simply out of the question….

… Anyway, do check out the links (even if some of them appear to be out of your reach on the first reading), and enjoy the song. … Take care, and bye for now…]

 

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