Back on the ‘net!

Hushshshsh… Finally I am back on the ‘net (I mean to say, in a real way—not via smartphone). But it’s not after having the broken laptop repaired. On the contrary, it seems as if it’s no longer viable to revive my broken laptop.

So, right now, I am writing this post using an even older laptop that I had. I dug it up from the cupboard, and revived it.

Actually, you can’t call it a laptop; even the manufacturer called it a notebook (the 2008 model Compaq Presario C700, 32-bit Intel Core Duo @ 1.83 GHz, 1 GB RAM). I used to use about a decade ago. All my PhD time programs and data were sitting on it. (The thesis had been written and submitted even earlier, even before I bought this notebook; it was written on a desktop I had back then. However, after submitting thesis, it took them 2 years to arrange for the defence. That’s how, it was on this machine that I had prepared my final defence slides.)

It was a dual boot machine, with one partition running XP, and the other, Vista. I had forgotten the password of the Vista, but fortunately, not of the XP.

The trouble with XP was that both the Mozilla and Internet Explorer installed on it had already become absolutely obsolete. Also Java. (The support for these software had vanished by 2014, I now gathered.) The browsers were so old that they couldn’t handle even simplest of today’s https requests—the SSL layer itself must have been too old. So, I couldn’t have used that OS even for just surfing on the ‘net.

So, what I did over the past couple of days was to first take a backup of my PhD-time data. Then, I proceeded to reformat the whole hard disk, and installed Lubuntu 18.04.1 on it.

Yes, Lubuntu does manage to run even on a 32-bit 1 GB machine. However, even with this comparatively light-weight OS, there is enormous disk-thrashing, particularly if I try to use a programming IDE. (After bootup, the OS by itself eats up something like 600–700 MB of RAM.) So far, I’ve tried installing and using PyCharm, Spyder and VSCode. They all do run, but very, very slowly. Sometimes, you have to even wait for a minute or so just for a context-switch between two processes (say, the browser and the IDE).

So, looks like despite all my valiant tries, this machine isn’t going to be useful for my ANN studies; it would be usable only for browsing. … May be I should borrow money and buy a new laptop….

But one way or the other, this decade-old machine still is better, much much better, than my new (late-2017 times) smart-phone. … As I said recently, the smart-phone is a bad idea. …

… Anyway, now that I am on the ‘net (can use a real keyboard), I should be back pretty soon, say tomorrow or the day after, with something which is much more exciting. That’s a promise. So, bye for now, but stay tuned.


A song I like:
(Marathi) “ekaach yaa janmi jaNu…”
Music: Sudhir Phadke
Lyrics: Sudhir Moghe
Singer: Asha Bhosale

[Usually, when you say “song,” what you usually mean is the basic tune. OK, sometimes, first the words and then the tune. However, this song is odd.

The real beauty of this song lies not in any one of its elements but in the way it unfolds—the way the music composer leads you through an interplay between various musical phrases and the lyrical ones. Especially noteworthy are the violin pieces which transition you from the stanza to the refrain and back. Also noteworthy is the interplay between the Western and the Indian instruments…

So, what rules here is not just the tune, not just the words, not just the orchestration, and not just the rendering in the voice by the singer. Instead, it is the skillfully arranged interplay between all these elements which truly gives the defining character to this song and makes it so beautiful.

So, it’s the music composer who really stands out here, even if the entire team is outstanding… Or so I believe. … Anyway, bye for now. ]

[May be a little streamlining, later on.]

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