Haptic, tactile, virtual, surgery, etc.

Three updates made on 24th March 2016 appear near the end of this post.


Once in a while I check out the map of the visitors’ locations (see the right bar).

Since hardly any one ever leaves any comment at my blog, I can only guess who these visitors possibly could be. Over a period of time, guessing the particular visitors in this way has become an idle sort of a past-time for me. (No, I don’t obsess over it, and I don’t in fact spend much time on it—at the most half-a-minute or so, once in a while. But, yes, check, I certainly do!)

Among the recent visitors, there was one hit on 6th March 2016 coming from Troy, NY, USA (at 11:48:02 AM IST, to be precise). … Must be someone from RPI, I thought. (My blog is such that mostly only academics could possibly be interested in it; never the people with lucrative industrial jobs such as those in the SF Bay Area. Most of the hits from the Bay Area are from Mountain View, and that’s the place where the bots of Google’s search engines live.)

But I couldn’t remember engaging in any discussion with any one from RPI on any blog.

Who could this visitor possibly be? I could not figure it out immediately, so I let the matter go.


Yesterday, I noticed for the first time an ad for “several” post-doc positions at RPI, posted on iMechanica by Prof. Suvranu De [^]. It had been posted right on the same day: 6th March 2016. However, since recently I was checking out only my thread on the compactness of support [^], I had missed out on the main front page. Thus, I noticed the ad only today.

Curious, I dropped an informal email to Prof. De immediately, almost more or less by cognitive habits.


I am not too keen on going to the USA, and in fact, I am not even inclined to leave India. Reasons are manifold.

You, as every one else on the planet, of course comes to know all that ever happens to or in the USA. Americans make sure that you do—whether you like it or not. (Remember 9/11? They have of course forgotten it by now, but don’t you remember the early naughties when, imagining you to be just as dumb and thick-skinned as they are,  the kind of decibels they had pierced into your metaphorical ears (and in fact also in your soul)? Justifiable, you say? How about other big “controversies” which actually were nothing but scandals? Can’t you pick up one or two?)

Naturally, who would want to go to that uncivilized a place?

And even if you want to argue otherwise, let me suggest you to see if you can or cannot easily gather (or recollect) what all that has happened to me when I was in the USA?

So, the idea of trying to impress Dr. De for this post-doc position was, any which way, completely out of the question. Even if he is HoD at RPI.

And then, frankly, at my age, I don’t even feel like impressing any one for a mere post-doc; not these days anyway (I mean, some 6 years after the PhD defense, and after having to experience so many years of joblessness (including those reported via this blog)). … As far as I am concerned, either they know what and who I am, and act accordingly (including acting swiftly enough), or they don’t. (In the last case, mostly, they end up blaming me, as usual, in some or the other way.)

OK, so, coming back to what I wrote Dr. De. It was more in the nature of a loud thinking about the question of whether I should at all apply to them in the first place or not. … Given my experience of the other American post-docs advertised at iMechanica, e.g. those by Prof. Sukumar (UC Davis), and certain others in the USA, and also my experience of the Americans of the Indian origin (and even among them, those who are JPBTIs and those who are younger to me by age), I can’t keep any realistic expectation that I would ever receive any reply to that email of mine from Prof. De. The odds are far too against; check out the “follow-up” tag. (I could, of course, be psychically attacked, the way I was, right this week, a few days ago.)

Anyway, once thus grown curious about the subject matter, I then did a bit of a Web search, and found the following videos:

The very first listing after a Google search (using the search string: “Suvranu De”; then clicking on the tab: “videos”) was the one on “virtual lap band – surgical simulation”: [^].

Watching that video somehow made me sort of uneasy immediately. Uneasy, in a minor but a definitely irritating way. In a distinctly palpable way, almost as if it was a physical discomfort. No, not because the video carries the scene of tissue-cutting and all. … I have never been one of those who feel nervous or squeamish at the sight of blood, cuts, etc. (Most men, in fact, don’t!) So, my uneasiness was not on that count. …

Soon enough (i.e., much before the time I was in the middle of that video), I figured out the reason why.

I then checked out a few more videos, e.g., those here [^] and here [^]. … Exactly the same sense of discomfort or uneasiness, arising out of the same basic reason.

What kind of an uneasiness could there possibly be? Can you guess?

I don’t want to tell you, right away. I want you to guess. (Assume that an evil smile had transitorily appeared on my face.)

To close this post: If you so want, go ahead, check out those videos, see if it makes you uncomfortable watching some part of an implementation of this new idea. Then, the sin of the sins (“paapam, paapam, mahaapaapam” in Sanskrit): drop me a line (via a comment or an email) stating what that reason possibly could be. (Hint: It has nothing to do with the feely-feely-actually-silly/wily sort of psychological reasons. )

After a while, I will come back, and via an update to this post let you know the reason.


Update 1:

Yahoo! wants you to make a note of the “12 common mistakes to avoid in job interview”: [^]. They published this article today.


Update 2 (on 24th March 2016):

Surprise! Prof.  De soon enough (on 18th March IST) dropped me an email which was brief, professional, but direct to the point. A consequence, and therefore not much of a surprise: I am more or less inclined to at least apply for the position. I have not done so as of today; see the Update 3 below.


Update 3 (on 24th March 2016):

Right the same day (on 18th March 2016 about 10:00 PM IST), my laptop developed serious hardware issues including (but not limited to) yet another HDD crash! The previous crash was less than a year ago, in last June  [^].

Once again, there was  loss of (some) data: the initial and less-than-25%-completed drafts of 4+ research papers, some parts (from sometime in February onwards) of my notes on the current course on CFD, SPH, etc., as well as some preliminary Python code on SPH). The Update 2 in fact got delayed because of this development. I just got the machine back from the Dell Service last evening, and last night got it going on a rapid test installation of Windows 7. I plan to do a more serious re-installation over the next few days.


Update 4 (on 24th March 2016):

The thing in the three videos (about haptics, virtual surgery) that made me uncomfortable or uneasy was the fact that in each case, the surgeon was standing in a way that would have been just a shade uncomfortable to me. The surgeon’s hands were too “free” i.e. unsupported (say near elbow), his torso was stooping down in a wrong way (you couldn’t maintain that posture with accuracy in hands manipulation for long, I thought), and at the same time, he had to keep his eyes fixed on a monitor that was a bit too high-up for the eyes-to-hands coordination to work right. In short, there was this seeming absence of a consideration of ergonomics or the human factors engineering here. Of course, it’s only a prototype, and it’s only a casual onlooker’s take of the “geometry,” but that’s what made me distinctly uncomfortable.

(People often have rationalistic ideas about the proper (i.e. the least stress inducing and most efficient) posture.  In a later post, I will point out a few of these.)

 


 

A Song I Like:
(filled-in on 24th March 2016)

(Marathi) “thembaanche painjaN waaje…” [“rutu premaachaa aalaa”]
Singers: Avadhoot Gupte, Vaishali Samant
Music: Shashank Powar
Lyrics: Ravi Wadkar (?)

[An incidental note: The crash occurred—the computer suddenly froze—while I was listening to—actually, watching the YouTube video of—this song. … Somehow, even today, I still continue liking the song! … But yes, as is usual for this section, only the audio track is being referred to. (I had run into this song while searching for some other song, which I will use in a later post.)]


[Some editorial touches, other than the planned update, are possible, as always.]

[E&OE]

 

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3 thoughts on “Haptic, tactile, virtual, surgery, etc.

  1. Hi Ajit! I’m sorry that my comments upon quantum transport theory — in weblogs like Shtetl Optimized, Gödel’s Lost Letter, GASARCH/Fortnow Computation Complexity, Mathematics Without Apologies, etc. — are unsatisfying to you.

    Given your interest in “haptic, tactile, virtual, surgery”, perhaps references to my pioneering research back in the 1990s (with Rick Matsen and Joe Garbini) on robot aided systems for surgery will be more interesting and satisfying.

    Connections  My present research focus, upon applications of quantum sensing relating to research and practice in regenerative medicine, arose from a dawning personal appreciation, back in the 1990s, that even a technically perfect surgical procedure is generally very far from a perfect medical procedure, in that the latter objective generically requires a broad understanding of quantum dynamics at molecular scales.

    Conclusion  Even medical researchers — perhaps especially medical researchers — have plenty of good reasons to follow contemporary developments in quantum information theory very carefully. Needless to say, it is neither necessary, nor feasible, nor desirable that everyone read the quantum information theory literature with the same interests and intent! 🙂

    • Hi John!

      Welcome to my blog!

      The issue is not the background from which you come or your knowledge. The issue is two-folds: (i) the style of writing (complete with bold headings like Context, Discussions, Conclusions), and (ii) the relevance of contents. On blogs, you are supposed to write informally, say, as if over a lunch after a seminar, or at hallways at a conference.

      In short: Do you talk like this over the lunch after a seminar?: “ahem [clears the throat]. Preface. The importance of this topic cannot be exaggerated, as it has been pointed out by XYZ (1992), LMN (1989), and in fact by ABC (1947) that such researches in the xyz field have a bearing on that in the abc field …” [where “such” is left unspecified anyway].

      And if you do, does any one listen to you (for long)?

      And if you don’t, why do you write comments in that manner?

      (Thanks, separately, for not taking offence.)

      Best,

      –Ajit
      [E&OE]

  2. I love reading John Sidles posts and so does John Preskill, the great Caltech physicist. Ajit you need to take your head out of your ass and take a deep breath.

    ramsare@gmail.com
    73.7.150.196

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