Free books on the nature of mathematics

Just passing along a quick tip, in case you didn’t know about it:

Early editions of quite a few wonderful books concerning history and nature of mathematics have now become available for free downloading at archive.org. (I hope they have checked the copyrights and all):

Books by Prof. Morris Kline:

  1. Mathematics in Western Culture (1954) [^]
  2. Mathematics and the Search for Knowledge (1985) [^]
  3. Mathematics and the Physical World (1959) [^] (I began Kline’s books with this one.)

Of course, Kline’s 3-volume book, “Mathematical Thought from Ancient to Modern Times,” is the most comprehensive and detailed one. However, it is not yet available off archive.org. But that hardly matters, because the book is in print, and a pretty inexpensive (Rs. ~1600) paperback is available at Amazon [^]. The Kindle edition is just Rs. 400.

(No, I don’t have Kindle. Neither do I plan to buy one. I will probably not use it even if someone gives it to me for free. I am sure I will find someone else to pass it on for free, again! … I don’t have any use for Kindle. I am old enough to like my books only the old-fashioned way—the fresh smell of the paper and the ink included. Or, the crispiness of the fading pages of an old one. And, I like my books better in the paperback format, not hard-cover. Easy to hold while comfortably reclining in my chair or while lying over a sofa or a bed.)

Anyway, back to archive.org.

Prof. G. H. Hardy’s “A Mathematician’s Apology,” too, has become available for free downloading [^]. It’s been more than two decades since I first read it. … Would love to find time to go through it again.

Anyway, enjoy! (And let me know if you run into some other interesting books at archive.org.)

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A Song I Like:
(Hindi) “chain se hum ko kabhie…”
Music: O. P. Nayyar
Singer: Asha Bhosale
Lyrics: S. H. Bihari

Incidentally, I have often thought that this song was ideally suited for a saxophone, i.e., apart from Asha’s voice. Not just any instrument, but, specifically, only a saxophone. … Today I searched for, and heard for the first time, a sax rendering—the one by Babbu Khan. It’s pretty good, though I had a bit of a feeling that someone could do better, probably, a lot better. Manohari Singh? Did he ever play this song on a sax?

As to the other instruments, though I often do like to listen to a flute (I mean the Indian flute (“baansuri”)), this song simply is not at all suited to one. For instance, just listen to Shridhar Kenkare’s rendering. The entire (Hindi) “dard” gets lost, and then, worse: that sweetness oozing out in its place, is just plain irritating. At least to me. On the other hand, also locate on the ‘net a violin version of this song, and listen to it. It’s pathetic. … Enough for today. I have lost the patience to try out any piano version, though I bet it would sound bad, too.

Sax. This masterpiece is meant for the sax. And, of course, Asha.

[E&OE]

 

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