The JEE Idiocy: Links to My Further Comments Elsewhere, and the Fallout at LinkedIn

Concerning the subject of my last post, viz. the JEE idiocy, I, as usual, had made many comments at others’ blogs, too.

I almost always make my comments at others’ blogs, quite on the fly (and, in fact, the same applies also to my blog posts, esp. those I make here). I often plan to bring those comments made at others’ blogs, over here at my blog, too. I often plan to put them here in a bit more polished form. And, it never happens. This is true of so many comments on so many issues that I have made so far.

However, now, I have decided to change.

One final push in this direction came in the form of an unwholesome episode to do with the “IIT Alumni” group at LinkedIn. This is the largest group of IITians on LinkedIn. It is populated by some 4000+ IITians, with statistically most of them expected to be JPBTIs. It apparently was founded by one Gunjan Bagla, apparently an IIT Kanpur graduate and a resident of Marina Del Rey (near/part of Los Angeles), CA, USA.

Mr. Gunjan Bagala (and possibly other people responsible for managing this group) removed me from that group without alerting me about the removal in advance.

That was not only the least expected part, it also was unethical.

Note, I didn’t much care about being removed from the group. Most certainly, I didn’t at all feel insulted or whatever. The interesting points are elsewhere.

Someone, in the exchange of a few private messages in the aftermath, described this removal of mine as an act of “censorship.” No, it’s not that, I had to remind him, in that private exchange. “Censorship”  is not the term applicable here, not in this context of private individuals and their private organizations; the term primarily applies to the case where the government (at the point of a gun) suppresses the principle of free speech, out of whatever rationalization it offers, usually, some purportedly high-sounding but actually in principle only some statist/authoratarian/dictatorial element/streak within itself.  Whether that element is essential to a given government, or it’s not so essential to it, isn’t the point in matters like these. In matters involving as basic rights as free speech, it doesn’t matter whether the government i.e. the gun-wielder is “mostly” benevolent or not. The only point of relevance is: that such an element is at all active. Censorship, primarily, applies to the suppression of free speech by the government. In contrast, as I understand it, a LinkedIn group is a private group.

Yet, unlike what so many defenders of “capitalism” (esp. Indians) think, the fact that it’s a private group does not make it either automatically right or even pragmatically so. The fact that it’s a private group does not make it incapable of being unethical, immoral, or evil.

What precisely is the moral transgression here, you ask?

Please note the facts of the case again. Removal, and the concomitant denial of access to my own thoughts, without any opportunity being given to me to save my thoughts (say to my hard disk) beforehand.

No matter what be the nature of my thoughts or expressions, the removal, in this manner, represents a moral transgression on their part.

Why do I think so? OK. Here is a counter-question. Can you think of an analogy? I can. It’s called “book burning” in my terms. Effectively, it’s been that.

And, if you don’t agree with me, please let me know how I may rightfully access each comment/post, each reply, each word that I wrote, right in its own context, on my own. …

So, you see now why it is immoral, why they are immoral.

BTW, a well-meaning JPBTI asked me not to worry because it would be archived. So typical of these JPBTIs. It didn’t occur to him that I still can’t have access to my own thoughts, whether archived or not. In that case, it’s like: putting the books behind the iron curtains. Or, elavating the bastards to the status of (Sanskrit) “Chitragupta” of “puraaNa”s (the Indian mythology). But, objectively speaking, as far as I am concerned, it effectively still remains the same as book burning.

Anyway, it’s time for me to focus on something else right now, and so, let me just jot down the links to a couple of other blogs where I have made comments concerning this issue:
(i) Prof. Dheeraj Sanghi’s blog [^]
(ii) Prof. Abinandanan’s blog [^]

I will try to get these comments, as well as many other comments/replies at many other blogs/threads over here. These include, in no particular order (and without being exhaustive about it), comments about: (i) the basic philosophic ideas of consciousness, soul, etc. (ii) difference between FVM and FEM, (iii) how element shape and quality of grid affects CFD solution (if it does!), (iv) points related to my research on QM, (v) proper translation of (Sanskrit) “karmaNyevaadhikaraste…,” and a lot, lot more… Clearly, it will take time for me to get my own points, over here. Probably, I will also get move this update to a separate post by itself. But, yes, in the meanwhile, I wanted you to note this LinkedIn things related to “IIT Alumni”, esp., JPBTIs.

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A Song I Like:
For some reason that shouldn’t be too difficult to guess by now, I will make an exception to my rule of not including this section so long as I go jobless, and note a song I like. BTW, it’s a song that happens to have been picturized on… hold your breath, Meena Kumaari !! (though, as usual, as far as this section goes, the visual aspect of a song never matters):

(Hindi): “kabhi to milegi, kanhi to milegi”
Singer: Lata Mangeshkar
Music: Roshan
Lyrics: Majrooh Sultanpuri

[E&OE]

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